3.3_Define Scope_Create WBS (one of the 40 Modules of PMP Exam Prep Course

This is one of the 40 modules of PMP Exam Preparation Course prepared by S M MUMTAZ AHMAD, PMP

Project ManagementPMP
1.0x

3.3_Define Scope_Create WBS (one of the 40 Modules of PMP Exam Prep Course

Created 2 years ago

Duration 0:25:25
lesson view count 621
This is one of the 40 modules of PMP Exam Preparation Course prepared by S M MUMTAZ AHMAD, PMP
Select the file type you wish to download
Slide Content
  1. PMP Exam Preparation CoursePlanning Process Group

    Slide 1 - PMP Exam Preparation CoursePlanning Process Group

    • Module 3.3
  2. Process Groups

    Slide 2 - Process Groups

    • (5)
    • Knowledge Areas (10)
    • Integration Mgmt
    • Scope
    • Mgmt
    • Time Mgmt
    • Cost Mgmt
    • Quality Mgmt
    • HR Mgmt
    • Comm Mgmt
    • Risk Mgmt
    • Procurement Mgmt
    • Project Stakeholder Management
    • Initiating
    • 4.1 Develop Project Charter
    • 13.1 Identify Stakeholders
    • Planning
    • 4.2 Develop Project Management Plan
    • 5.1 Plan Scope Management
    • 5.2 Collect Requirements
    • 5.3 Define Scope
    • 5.4 Create WBS
    • 6.1 Plan Schedule Management
    • 6.2 Define Activities
    • 6.3 Sequence Activities
    • 6.4 Estimate Activity Resources
    • 6.5 Estimate,
    • Activity Durations
    • 6.6 Develop Schedule
    • 7.1 Plan Cost Management
    • 7.2 Estimate Costs
    • 7.3 Determine
    • Budget
    • 8.1 Plan Quality Management
    • 9.1 Plan
    • Human Resource Management
    • 10.1 Plan Communication Management
    • 11.1 Plan Risk Management ,
    • 11.2 Identify Risks
    • 11.3 Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis,
    • 11.4 Perform Quantitative Risk Analysis, 11.5 Plan Risk Responses
    • 12.1 Plan Procurements Management
    • 13.2 Plan Stakeholder Management
    • Executing
    • 4.3 Direct & Manage Project Work
    • 8.2 Perform Quality Assurance
    • 9.2 Acquire Project Team
    • 9.3 Develop Project Team
    • 9.4Manag Proj Team
    • 10.2 Manage Communications
    • 12.2 Conduct Procurements
    • 13.3.Manage Stakeholder Engagement3
    • Monitoring
    • & Controlling
    • 4.4 Monitor & Control Project Work
    • 4.5 Perform Integrated Change Control
    • 5.5 Validate Scope
    • 5.6 control Scope
    • 6.7 Control Schedule
    • 7.4 Control Cost
    • 8.3 Control Quality
    • 10.3 Control Communications
    • 11.6 Control Risk
    • 12.3 Control Procurements
    • 13.4 Control Stakeholder Engagement
    • Closing
    • 4.6 Close Project or phase
    • 12.4 Close Procurements
    • 2
  3. In this Module you will learn…

    Slide 3 - In this Module you will learn…

    • Learning Objectives
  4. Course Outline

    Slide 4 - Course Outline

    • Inputs, Tools & technique & Output of Create WBS
    • Different WBS
    • Work Packages
    • Control Account & WBS Dictionary
    • Inputs, Tools & technique & Output of Define Scope
  5. Define Scope

    Slide 5 - Define Scope

    • Tools and Techniques
    • 1. Expert judgment
    • 2. Product analysis
    • 3. Alternatives Generation
    • 4. Facilitated workshops
    • Inputs
    • Scope Management Plan.
    • Project charter.
    • Requirements documentation.
    • Organizational process assets
    • Outputs
    • 1. Project scope statement
    • 2. Project document update
    • Define Scope is the process of developing a detailed project scope statement
  6. Define Scope -Inputs

    Slide 6 - Define Scope -Inputs

    • Policies & Guidelines, formal and informal procedures, and templates for a project scope statement
    • Project files
    • Lesson learned
    • Project Charter
    • provides the high-level project description and product characteristics.
    • If a project charter is not used in the performing organization, then comparable requirements needs to be acquired or developed.
    • Organizational Process Assets:
  7. Define Scope - Tools and Techniques

    Slide 7 - Define Scope - Tools and Techniques

    • Product Analysis:
    • This can be an effective tool for project having product as a deliverable, as opposed to service or result.
    • This is the Method for translating project objectives into tangible deliverables and requirements.
    • Includes techniques such as
    • product breakdown
    • system analysis
    • requirement analysis,
    • system engineering
    • value engineering
    • value analysis
  8. Alternative Generation

    Slide 8 - Alternative Generation

    • Alternative Generation:
    • Includes techniques such as
    • Brainstorming
    • lateral thinking
    • analysis of alternatives
    • Lateral thinking .
    • It refers to solving problems through an indirect and creative approach. Lateral thinking is about reasoning that is not immediately obvious and about ideas that may not be obtainable by using only traditional step-by-step logic.
  9. Other units within the organization

    Slide 9 - Other units within the organization

    • Consultants
    • Stakeholders including customers or sponsors
    • Professional and Technical association
    • Industry groups
    • Subject matter experts
    • Define Scope- Tools & Technique
    • Expert Judgement
  10. Product Analysis

    Slide 10 - Product Analysis

    • Product breakdown- involves developing a better understanding of the projects product by breaking it down into constituent parts
    • Value Engineering- examines each element of a product or system to determine whether there is a more effective and less expensive way to achieve the same function
    • Value Analysis-Focuses on optimizing cost performance. Systematic use of the techniques to identify the required function of an item, establishes values for those functions, and provide the functions at the lowest overall cost without the loss of performance
    • Functional Analysis- Examines the project’s high level requirements statements, identifying specific functions and estimating total costs based on the number of functions to be performed
  11. Now you will listen to some discussion at tea break

    Slide 11 - Now you will listen to some discussion at tea break

  12. Product analysis and gathering requirement seems to me a bit similar. What differentiates them?

    Slide 12 - Product analysis and gathering requirement seems to me a bit similar. What differentiates them?

  13. Product analysis deals with deliverables to complete the work while requirement gathering deals with the needs which the product will fulfil

    Slide 13 - Product analysis deals with deliverables to complete the work while requirement gathering deals with the needs which the product will fulfil

  14. Define Scope- Outputs

    Slide 14 - Define Scope- Outputs

    • Project Scope Statement:
    • Project Scope description
    • Project Deliverables
    • Project exclusions
    • Product Acceptance Criteria
    • Project Constraints
    • Project Assumptions
    • Project Document updates
    • It includes but not limited to:
    • Stakeholder register
    • Requirements documentation
    • Requirement traceability matrix
  15. Scope Statement Template

    Slide 15 - Scope Statement Template

    • Project Name:
    • Prepared by:
    • Date:
    • Project Justification:
    • The business need that the project was undertaken to address. The project justification provides the basis for evaluating future tradeoffs.
    •   Product Description:
    • A brief summary of the product description
    •  Project Deliverables:
    • A list of the summary-level sub products whose full and satisfactory delivery marks completion of the project.
    •  Deliverable A
    •  Deliverable B
    •  Deliverable C
    • Known Exclusions
    • Project Objectives:
    • The quantifiable criteria that must be met for the project to be considered successful. Project objectives must include at least cost, schedule, and quality measures.
    • Cost Objectives (quantify)
    •  Schedule Objectives (start and stop dates)
    • Quality Measures (criteria that will determine acceptability)
    • Other Objectives
  16. Brain Teasers

    Slide 16 - Brain Teasers

    • What is difference between Project Charter and a project scope statement.
    • What is the difference between Scope and a Project Scope Statement
    • Who generally prepares and issues Project Charters
  17. Answers to Brain Teasers

    Slide 17 - Answers to Brain Teasers

    • A charter authorizes the Project. The Scope Statement defines the project in details and includes the specific objectives.
    • Scope is the sum of product and services to be delivered as a project. The project scope statement is the narrative description of the project scope and includes the major deliverable, objectives, assumptions, and constraints of the project.
    • The Sponsor or Project initiator.
  18. Create WBS

    Slide 18 - Create WBS

    • Define Scope
    • Control Scope
    • Collect Requirement
    • Create WBS
    • Verify Scope
  19. How can you eat Camel?

    Slide 19 - How can you eat Camel?

  20.           Create WBS

    Slide 23 - Create WBS

    • Projects cannot be planned, organized, managed and controlled unless it is broken into smaller and more manageable pieces. This is a Top down effort to decompose the work into smaller pieces called “work packages”
    • Create the WBS (Work Breakdown Structure) is the process of subdividing the major project deliverables and project work into smaller, more manageable components called work packages:
  21. WBS

    Slide 24 - WBS

    • A Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) is a deliverable oriented grouping of project components that organizes and defines the total scope of the project; work not in the WBS is outside the scope of the project. A WBS is normally presented in chart form. Each descending level represents an increasingly detailed description of the project deliverables.
  22. WBS

    Slide 25 - WBS

    • It may look like a Corporate organization but it is not.
    • Most commonly, the top level of the project is the project title.
    • The first level is same as project life cycle (for a software project-requirement analysis, design, coding, testing, conversion or operation)
    • The second and later levels break the project into smaller pieces
    • It is created with the help of team
    • Each level of WBS is a smaller piece of the level above.
    • Includes only work needed to create deliverables
    • Work not in WBS is not the part of the project.
    • Organizes and defines the total scope of the project.
    • Continue breaking down the project until you reach what is called work package.
  23. Work Packages

    Slide 26 - Work Packages

    • Can be realistically and confidently estimated
    • can be scheduled, cost estimated, monitored, and controlled.
    • Cannot be logically subdivided further
    • Can be compiled quickly
    • Have a meaningful conclusion and deliverable
    • Can be completed without any interruption (without the need of more information)
    • May be outsourced and contracted
    • On smaller projects the work package may be of duration of 4 to 40 hours.
    • On larger projects it may expand to 300 hours-there is no rule of thumb.
  24. Control Accounts

    Slide 27 - Control Accounts

    • In larger projects one might not want to estimate costs to the same level of detail as low as work package. The level, higher in the WBS than a work package, is called the control account. This is also known as Management Control Point.
  25. What is Deliverable?

    Slide 28 - What is Deliverable?

    • Any unique and verifiable product, result, or capability to perform a service that must be produced to complete a process, phase, or project.
    • Deliverables are tangible, verifiable/ provable.
  26. Displaying the WBS as a Tabular List

    Slide 29 - Displaying the WBS as a Tabular List

    • 1.0 Program
    • 1.1 Training
    • 1.2 Hardware
    • 1.2.1 Engineering Subsystem
    • 1.2.2 Manufacturing Subsystem
    • 1.2.2.1 Module A
    • 1.2.2.2 Module B
    • 1.2.3 Component Testing
    • 1.3 Project Management
    • Numbers assigned are also known as Code of account
  27. Create WBS

    Slide 30 - Create WBS

    • Tools and Techniques
    • Decomposition
    • Expert judgment
    • Inputs
    • 1. Project scope statement
    • 2. Requirements documentation
    • 3. Organizational process assets
    • 4. Enterprise environment fctors
    • Outputs
    • 1. Scope baseline
    • 2. Project document updates
  28. Create WBS Tools and Techniques

    Slide 31 - Create WBS Tools and Techniques

    • Decomposition
    • Subdividing the major project deliverables into smaller, more manageable components until the deliverables are defined to the work package level.
    • Different deliverables have different levels of decomposition.
    • Decomposition of total project work generally involves the following activities:
    • Identifying the deliverables and related work
    • Structuring and organizing the WBS.
    • Decomposing the upper WBS levels into lower level
    • detailed component
    • s.
    • Developing and assigning identification codes to WBS components..
    • components.
  29. WBS with some branches decomposed down through Work Packages

    Slide 32 - WBS with some branches decomposed down through Work Packages

  30. Work Breakdown Structure organized by Phase

    Slide 33 - Work Breakdown Structure organized by Phase

  31. Work Breakdown Structure with Major Deliverables

    Slide 34 - Work Breakdown Structure with Major Deliverables

  32. How will I decide that I should use Deliverables or phase for creating WBS?

    Slide 35 - How will I decide that I should use Deliverables or phase for creating WBS?

  33. Create WBS Outputs

    Slide 36 - Create WBS Outputs

    • Scope Baseline:
    • The approved detailed Project Scope Statement and its associated WBS and WBS Dictionary make up the Scope Baseline for the project.
    • Measurements of project success include whether the project requirements and Scope Baseline have been met
  34. Create WBS Outputs

    Slide 37 - Create WBS Outputs

    • Work Breakdown Structure:
    • A deliverable-oriented
    • hierarchical
    • decomposition of the
    • work to be executed by
    • the project team to
    • accomplish the project
    • objectives and create
    • the required
    • deliverables.
  35. Create WBSOutputs

    Slide 38 - Create WBSOutputs

    • A companion document to the WBS that describes each component of the WBS, including: work package descriptions, defined deliverables, list of associated activities and milestones, schedule dates, cost budgets, and staff assignments.
    • Each component of a WBS is assigned a unique identifier. Collectively, these unique identifiers are known as the code of accounts.
    • WBS Dictionary
    • WBS Dictionary Sample
  36. Create WBSOutputs (continued)

    Slide 39 - Create WBSOutputs (continued)

    • Project Document Updates
    • Project documents that may be updated include, but are not limited to requirements documentation.
    • If approved change requests result from the Create WBS process, then the requirements documentation may be need to be updated to include approved changes.
  37. Now you will listen to some discussion at tea break

    Slide 40 - Now you will listen to some discussion at tea break

  38. I always see WBS in the graphical shape. Can’t I have it in list form?

    Slide 41 - I always see WBS in the graphical shape. Can’t I have it in list form?

  39. Yes they need to be in graphical because they show how phases and deliverables are decomposed. Listing in very small project may give you this idea but in larger projects with hundreds and thousands of work packages listing will be just confusing.

    Slide 42 - Yes they need to be in graphical because they show how phases and deliverables are decomposed. Listing in very small project may give you this idea but in larger projects with hundreds and thousands of work packages listing will be just confusing.

  40. Slide 45

    • Some Sample Questions for PMP Exam
  41. We have finished this session.

    Slide 48 - We have finished this session.

    • Lets rejoice!