Community Profiling 11th February 2015 Published

Used at the Church Planting Forum Seminar on Community Profiling

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Community Profiling 11th February 2015 Published

Created 3 years ago

Duration 0:53:19
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Used at the Church Planting Forum Seminar on Community Profiling
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Slide Content
  1. Community Profiling: focusing our prayers

    Slide 1 - Community Profiling: focusing our prayers

    • Chris Page Keith Fostercrpage@msn.com keith@bethelcoventry.org.uk
    • @crpage
  2. Overview

    Slide 2 - Overview

    • What can we find out about our community?
    • The power of listening
    • Visualisation by Booth
    • Asking questions, collecting statistics
    • The 2011 Census and Output Areas
    • Visualising statistics for prayer
    • Traditional maps
    • Interactive visualisations
    • Simplify – IMD and OAC
    • What questions should we be asking?
    • The Thinking Amoeba
    • Analysing communication
  3. Looking at our community

    Slide 3 - Looking at our community

  4. How much does this tell you?

    Slide 4 - How much does this tell you?

  5. Listening to the CommunitySpon End, 2008/9 http://vimeo.com/35173428

    Slide 5 - Listening to the CommunitySpon End, 2008/9 http://vimeo.com/35173428

  6. Charles Booth, Social Map of London

    Slide 6 - Charles Booth, Social Map of London

    • …a tripartite investigation of their places of work…their homes… the religious life of the city.
  7. Booth Questionnaire

    Slide 7 - Booth Questionnaire

  8. Slide 8

    • The UK Census, undertaken every 10 years, with the most recent being on 27 March 2011, collects population and other statistics essential to those who have to plan and allocate resources.
    • The 2011 Census in England and Wales is a rich data source providing a detailed snapshot of the population, its characteristics, and its housing. In comparison with data from previous censuses, it also enables us to tracks changes in society over time. Interactive charts and maps allow you to explore census data like never before.
    • 2011 Census Interactive http://goo.gl/KZrWpu
  9. Which Census questions help us understand our community?

    Slide 9 - Which Census questions help us understand our community?

  10. How can we show the statistics? Statistical Geography – Output Areas

    Slide 10 - How can we show the statistics? Statistical Geography – Output Areas

  11. What is an Output Area?

    Slide 11 - What is an Output Area?

    • Output areas (OAs) are created for Census data, specifically for the output of census estimates.
    • The OA is the smallest geographical level at which census estimates are provided.
    • They were designed to have similar population sizes (average 272) and be as socially homogenous as possible based on tenure of household and dwelling type.
    • Output areas were introduced in all the countries of the UK at the 2001 Census and 2.6 per cent of 2001 OAs have been changed as a result of the 2011 Census (population and boundary changes)
  12. Viewing the Statistics

    Slide 12 - Viewing the Statistics

  13. The Traditional View

    Slide 13 - The Traditional View

    • Shade Output Areas to represent the value of single statistics
    • The Map Legend explains the link between shade and value
    • Pop-up windows contain statistics
  14. PrayerViz access to Traditional Maps

    Slide 14 - PrayerViz access to Traditional Maps

  15. DataShine – interactive coloured buildings

    Slide 15 - DataShine – interactive coloured buildings

  16. Examples of Census Statistics

    Slide 16 - Examples of Census Statistics

  17. How to display lots of statistics?

    Slide 17 - How to display lots of statistics?

  18. Simplifying the statistics – IMD Index of Multiple Deprivation

    Slide 18 - Simplifying the statistics – IMD Index of Multiple Deprivation

    • IMD 2010 will be updated in the summer
    • Income Deprivation
    • Employment Deprivation
    • Health Deprivation and Disability
    • Education, Skills and Training Deprivation
    • Barriers to Housing and Services
    • Crime
    • Living Environment Deprivation
  19. Oliver O’Brien (UCL) Index of Multiple Deprivation 2010 (IMD)

    Slide 19 - Oliver O’Brien (UCL) Index of Multiple Deprivation 2010 (IMD)

  20. Output Area Classifications (OAC) derived from the 2001 Census

    Slide 20 - Output Area Classifications (OAC) derived from the 2001 Census

  21. 2011 Area ClassificationsUniversity College London (UCL)

    Slide 21 - 2011 Area ClassificationsUniversity College London (UCL)

    • Area classifications group together geographic areas according to key characteristics common to the population in that grouping.
    • These groupings are called clusters and are derived using census data.
    • Map Created by Chris Gale and Oliver O'Brien
    • Details at http://goo.gl/KfhzF6
    • UCL has made all the data available http://geogale.github.io/2011OAC/
  22. OAC is A Geodemographic Classification:

    Slide 22 - OAC is A Geodemographic Classification:

    • Simplifies a large and complex body of information about a population, where and how they live and work
    • Based on premise that similar people
    • live in similar locations,
    • undertake similar activities and
    • have similar lifestyles and that
    • such area types will be distributed in different locations across a geographical space
  23. Output Area Classifications 2011

    Slide 23 - Output Area Classifications 2011

  24. Classification, Pen Portraits and Profiles

    Slide 24 - Classification, Pen Portraits and Profiles

  25. Downloading PrayerViz

    Slide 25 - Downloading PrayerViz

  26. Overview

    Slide 26 - Overview

    • What can we find out about our community?
    • The power of listening
    • Visualisation by Booth
    • Asking questions, collecting statistics
    • The 2011 Census and Output Areas
    • Visualising statistics for prayer
    • Traditional maps
    • Interactive visualisations
    • Simplify – IMD and OAC
    • What questions should we be asking?
    • The Thinking Amoeba
    • Analysing communication
  27. Overview

    Slide 27 - Overview

    • What can we find out about our community?
    • The power of listening
    • Visualisation by Booth
    • Asking questions, collecting statistics
    • The 2011 Census and Output Areas
    • Visualising statistics for prayer
    • Traditional maps
    • Interactive visualisations
    • Simplify – IMD and OAC
    • What questions should we be asking?
    • The Thinking Amoeba
    • Analysing communication
  28. Collecting our own statistics

    Slide 28 - Collecting our own statistics

    •  What Questions would you ask?
    • What changes have you noticed over the last few years?
    • What does the word community mean to you?
    • What do you like about your community?
    • [Tell me some more about …]+ 
    • What would you like to see changed?
    • [Tell me some more about …]+
  29. Think about the Questions?

    Slide 29 - Think about the Questions?

  30. Think about Your Community

    Slide 30 - Think about Your Community

    • It is tempting to view it as comprising of various groups, each with specific needs. Using this lens, we see things from a particular perspective: the youth with nothing to do; a group of older people who are lonely and isolated; people who provide unpaid care for 40+ hours per week who need support. These people would soon become our clients that present us with problems that need fixing. If we were to approach from that direction we would run the risk of creating a barrier between "us" and "them" which is out of step with the Gospel. Starting with people's needs usually leads to programmes for "us" to use "our resources" to meet "their" needs.
    • By using a different approach it is possible for us to form relationships that connect people to resources and to opportunities for them to build a community that meets their aspirations. These relationships live out the Gospel:
    • In 1Co 10:33 Paul writes… For I am not seeking my own good but the good of many, so that they may be saved.
  31. Speak when you have listened – Bruchko, after five years …

    Slide 31 - Speak when you have listened – Bruchko, after five years …

  32. Amazing but true…

    Slide 32 - Amazing but true…

    • Can you solve the maze?
    • How many solutions
    • Which is the shortest path
    • Even an Amoeba can solve the maze!
    • How?
    • Communication, communication, communication!
  33. Heather Barnett: What humans can learn from semi-intelligent slime (TED)

    Slide 33 - Heather Barnett: What humans can learn from semi-intelligent slime (TED)

  34. How well do we communicate?YouTube Videos related to Church Planting

    Slide 34 - How well do we communicate?YouTube Videos related to Church Planting

  35. Analysing Communication…

    Slide 35 - Analysing Communication…

  36. NodeXL free Add-In for Excel http://youtu.be/0M3T65Iw3Ac

    Slide 36 - NodeXL free Add-In for Excel http://youtu.be/0M3T65Iw3Ac

  37. PeopleMaps.org – Social Connections

    Slide 37 - PeopleMaps.org – Social Connections

  38. PeopleMaps.org – Social Connections

    Slide 38 - PeopleMaps.org – Social Connections

  39. Meet and Tweet?Map of 6,341,973,478 tweets

    Slide 39 - Meet and Tweet?Map of 6,341,973,478 tweets

    • Eric Fischer on December 03 2014
    • http://goo.gl/KLe2C3
  40. Join the conversation

    Slide 40 - Join the conversation

    • What can we find out about our community?
    • The power of listening
    • Visualisation by Booth
    • Asking questions, collecting statistics
    • The 2011 Census and Output Areas
    • Visualising statistics for prayer
    • Traditional maps
    • Interactive visualisations
    • Simplify – IMD and OAC
    • What questions should we be asking?
    • The Thinking Amoeba
    • Analysing communication
    • Where do we go from here…
  41. The World? Hans Rosling GapMinder.org

    Slide 41 - The World? Hans Rosling GapMinder.org

    • http://youtu.be/hVimVzgtD6w
  42. Thank you

    Slide 42 - Thank you