R-E-A-D

Presenters: June Parsons & Amanda Lyons R-E-A-D. To your students, it is a four-letter word. Can you change that attitude? Yes! And you'll have the help of an evolving generation of learning tools designed specifically for the challenging characteristics of today's students. Just what are these tools and how can you introduce them in your classroom? Join June Jamrich Parsons and Amanda Lyons as they demonstrate techniques for effectively using print-based and online tools that engage students in the reading process. You'll leave this session with a set of techniques for motivating students to complete assigned readings and for helping students to develop successful reading strategies within the field of Information Technology. This session is essential for instructors using New Perspectives on Computer Concepts and for those looking for ways to increase student engagement in the Introductory course.

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R-E-A-D

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Presenters: June Parsons & Amanda Lyons R-E-A-D. To your students, it is a four-letter word. Can you change that attitude? Yes! And you'll have the help of an evolving generation of learning tools designed specifically for the challenging characteristics of today's students. Just what are these tools and how can you introduce them in your classroom? Join June Jamrich Parsons and Amanda Lyons as they demonstrate techniques for effectively using print-based and online tools that engage students in the reading process. You'll leave this session with a set of techniques for motivating students to complete assigned readings and for helping students to develop successful reading strategies within the field of Information Technology. This session is essential for instructors using New Perspectives on Computer Concepts and for those looking for ways to increase student engagement in the Introductory course.
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Slide Content
  1. R-E-A-D

    Slide 1 - R-E-A-D

    • June Parsons, Cengage Learning Author
  2. The Presenters

    Slide 2 - The Presenters

    • June Jamrich Parsons
    • 20 years teaching experience Northern Michigan University and University of the Virgin Islands
    • Computer Science Curriculum designer
    • ICT Literacy director
    • Founding author New Perspectives, Practical, and e-Course series
    • Consulting author, Illustrated concepts
    • Just finishing a top-to-toe revision of New Perspectives
    • Fun fact: Writes Edison Jones adventure novels for middle grade readers ages 8-12
    • 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference
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  3. Amanda Lyons

    Slide 3 - Amanda Lyons

    • Cengage Product Manager for concepts titles
    • Started at Thomson in 2007 as Editorial Assistant on K-12 Editorial team.
    • Past 8 years at Cengage working with Soft Skills, Adobe, HTML, Office, and Concepts for the New Perspectives, Illustrated, Shelly Cashman, and BASICS series.
    • Fun fact: Celebrating two weddings this year and enjoys inventing different sandwich combinations
    • 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference
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  4. Overview

    Slide 4 - Overview

    • What does the research tell us about college student reading proficiency?
    • What is unique about reading in our discipline.
    • How can we help our students improve their discipline-specific reading ability (and encourage them to read assignments)?
    • How can a textbook help?
    • 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference
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  5. 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference

    Slide 5 - 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference

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    • TL;DR
  6. http://ask.metafilter.com/136021/How-can-I-learn-to-read-technical-documents

    Slide 6 - http://ask.metafilter.com/136021/How-can-I-learn-to-read-technical-documents

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    • For as long as I can remember, I've had a hard time reading technical documents or books. This sucks, because I'm a sysadmin and have been working with computers for as long as I can remember and don't want to do anything else. I made it through my computer science degree largely by learning through doing and labs.
    • Lectures and required reading, however, both had the same effect: about 10 minutes in, as soon as the technical details surfaced, my mind glossed over and it became extremely hard to pay attention.
  7. My Students Don’t Read!

    Slide 7 - My Students Don’t Read!

    • 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference
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  8. What do you think?

    Slide 8 - What do you think?

    • Has college student reading ability increased or declined since the 1970s?
    • What percentage of college students are able to synthesize and learn from advance reading materials?
    • What percentage of students read assigned materials to prepare for class?
    • How many hours per week does the average student spend reading assigned material?
    • How many students actually have the textbook (paper or electronic)?
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  9. Reading Ability of 17 Year Olds

    Slide 9 - Reading Ability of 17 Year Olds

    • NAEP Assessment Scores form National Center for Education Statistics 2014
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    • 1971
    • 2012
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  10. Reading Ability of 17 Year Olds

    Slide 10 - Reading Ability of 17 Year Olds

    • NAEP Assessment Scores form National Center for Education Statistics 2014
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    • Basic: Understand specific or sequentially related information,
    • search for specific information, interrelate ideas, and make generalizations.
    • Proficient: Find, understand, summarize, and explain relatively complicated information.
    • Advanced: Synthesize and learn from specialized reading materials.
  11. 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference

    Slide 11 - 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference

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  12. BUT…

    Slide 12 - BUT…

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  13. Non-compliance

    Slide 13 - Non-compliance

    • Hobson, Getting Students to Read: fourteen Tips
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  14. Reading Habits of College Students in the United States

    Slide 14 - Reading Habits of College Students in the United States

    • Huang, Blacklock, and Capps 2013
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    • 1,265 students
    • 20 hours reading
    • 8.9 hours on the Internet
    • 7.7 hours on academic reading
    • 4.4 hours extracurricular reading
  15. Slide 15

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    • 15 hours/week preparing for class
    • 7 hours reading
    • NSSE Study of Student Engagement 2014
  16. Studying vs Cell Phone Use

    Slide 16 - Studying vs Cell Phone Use

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    • Baylor study in J of Behavioral addictions
    • 56 Hours
    • 70 Hours
    • 15 Hours
    • 15 Hours
  17. Some Students Don’t Buy the Textbook

    Slide 17 - Some Students Don’t Buy the Textbook

    • Nielsen PubTrack Higher Ed.
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  18. What is unique about reading in our discipline?

    Slide 18 - What is unique about reading in our discipline?

  19. What do you think?

    Slide 19 - What do you think?

    • List three elements of documentation, textbooks, tutorials, or user manuals that make reading in the CIS and IT disciplines “hard”
    • 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference
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  20. 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference

    Slide 20 - 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference

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    • IT documents commonly include section headings, figures, tables, diagrams, maps, drawings, photographs, reference lists and endnotes. These elements are all designed to guide the reader. We need to make sure students understand how to use these elements as comprehension tools.
    • Reading in the IT discipline also requires visual literacy, because documents use diagrams, drawings, photographs and maps to convey meanings.
    • IT documents may use scientific syntax to express technical vocabulary and syntax, such as the use of embedded clauses to define terms.
    • Reading may be structured based on categories and taxonomies that represent conceptual relationships.
    • IT documentation is loaded with acronyms, jargon, and terminology with special meaning.
    • Documentation may include steps and detailed procedures.
  21. How can we help students develop discipline-specific reading proficiency?

    Slide 21 - How can we help students develop discipline-specific reading proficiency?

  22. Do you explicitly work with students to help them:

    Slide 22 - Do you explicitly work with students to help them:

    • 1. Pace their reading
    • 2. Scan and preview assigned readings
    • 3. Deal with definitions, key terms, acronyms, jargon
    • 4. Take effective notes
    • 5. Effectively internalize concepts, facts, and procedures
    • 6. Apply what they learn
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  23. Pacing

    Slide 23 - Pacing

    • Approach technical texts differently than novels
    • Read-think-read-think
    • Manageable chunks
    • Time estimate
    • Why? If students try to read too much at a time, they will try to finish too quickly and not take time to engage with the concepts.
    • 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference
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  24. Scan and Preview

    Slide 24 - Scan and Preview

    • Identify markers of transitions and conclusions
    • Identify the topic and why it is relevant
    • Pay attention to these parts
    • Look for taxonomies
    • Make it compelling
    • Why? Technical readings contain structures that are the key to understanding and internalizing concepts.
    • 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference
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  25. Markers of Transitions and Conclusions

    Slide 25 - Markers of Transitions and Conclusions

    • Ideas and “threads” in a text have a start and an end.
    • Help your students recognize start and end markers
    • Headings
    • Paragraphs
    • Pages
    • Figures
    • 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference
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  26. Taxonomies

    Slide 26 - Taxonomies

    • Help your students understand that technical works have underlying taxonomies that are usually hierarchical
    • Help students identify hierarchies and taxonomies using outlines, hierarchy charts, or mind maps
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  27. Make it compelling

    Slide 27 - Make it compelling

    • Mystery
    • Controversy
    • Quest
    • 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference
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  28. Vocabulary

    Slide 28 - Vocabulary

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  29. Vocabulary

    Slide 29 - Vocabulary

    • Conventions used for key vocabulary words
    • Everyday words may have special meanings
    • Keep a list of acronyms
    • Preview five terms that might cause the most confusion
    • Why? Learning technical vocabulary can be as challenging as learning a foreign language.
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  30. Take Notes

    Slide 30 - Take Notes

    • Write or type a note for each main idea and its supporting detail
    • Why underlining the “important stuff” might not be a good practice: It is all important. Otherwise it wouldn’t be in the book.
    • Underline the stuff you don’t understand. Go back to it later. See if it makes sense. No? Ask your instructor.
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  31. 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference

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  33. Internalize concepts

    Slide 33 - Internalize concepts

    • Help students determine what they need to memorize and what they can look up later
    • Talk about retrieval techniques (next slide)
    • Why? Learning concepts means being able to retrieve them for tests and apply them in the real world.
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  34. Memorization Priority

    Slide 34 - Memorization Priority

    • Terms
    • Tips
    • Guidelines
    • Procedures
    • Menus
    • Commands
    • 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference
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  35. Retrieval

    Slide 35 - Retrieval

    • Talk to the duck
    • List
    • Diagram
    • Quiz
    • 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference
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  36. Apply concepts and skills

    Slide 36 - Apply concepts and skills

    • Try it
    • Look it up in Wikipedia
    • Look for an image online
    • Look for a YouTube video
    • Provide an activity sheet that corresponds to reading
    • Why? Applying a concept makes it stick.
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  37. How can the textbook help?

    Slide 37 - How can the textbook help?

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  38. How well does your textbook:

    Slide 38 - How well does your textbook:

    • Help students identify hierarchies and taxonomies
    • Engage students with controversies, issues, and quests
    • Give students an opportunity to apply what they learn while reading
    • Help students visualize concepts as they are reading
    • Practice retrieval
    • 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference
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  52. You now should have a pretty good idea about:

    Slide 52 - You now should have a pretty good idea about:

    • The reading proficiencies and deficiencies of the average college student
    • What is unique about reading in our discipline
    • How can we help students improve their discipline-specific reading ability
    • How textbooks such as NP2014 can help ease students into technical literacy
    • 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference
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  53. Further Reference

    Slide 53 - Further Reference

    • 2015 Cengage Learning Computing Conference
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    • Bean, J.S. Engaging Ideas: the Professor’s Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom. Ten-point list of student reading difficulties and 11-point list of strategies.
    • Pam A. Mueller and Daniel M. Oppenheimer The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard: Advantages of Longhand Over Laptop Note Taking http://people.psych.cornell.edu/~jec7/pcd%202013-14%20pubs/mueller&oppen.pdf
    • http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/subject/publications/main2012/pdf/2013456.pdf
    • http://carnegie.org/fileadmin/Media/Publications/PDF/tta_Lee.pdf