Devin Armstrong Shipwrecked Final

Businesscommercesurvivalshipwreckedopportunity costscarcityeconomic problem
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Devin Armstrong Shipwrecked Final

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  1. By Devin Armstrong

    Slide 1 - By Devin Armstrong

  2. Primary concern in the immediate term is survival

    Slide 2 - Primary concern in the immediate term is survival

    • Eventual goal is to leave the island, either by boat or being rescued
    • Our economic problem: to most effectively allocate our resources in order to survive and leave the island.
    • To do this we must all co-operate and use our fishing and survival expertise and entrepreneurship if we have any chance of not dying.
    • My plan will guarantee us survival and returning back home.
  3. Slide 3

    • There are three basic economic concepts that we must bear in mind. These are scarcity, opportunity cost and resources.
    • Resources
    • The productive inputs that are required to make goods and services.
    • Scarcity
    • The ever-present situation where there are not enough resources available to meet demand, e.g. rope.
    • Opportunity Cost
    • The instance where scarce resources must be sacrificed for use in an alternative, superior use for which benefits are greater.
  4. Fortunately we have been deserted on an island with an abundance of varied and useful resources.

    Slide 4 - Fortunately we have been deserted on an island with an abundance of varied and useful resources.

    • The allocation of these resources will determine our survival, where are there most benefits, and where can we afford not to direct factors of production.
    • Capital
    • Land
    • Labour
    • Enterprise
    • Knives
    • Machetes
    • Large palm trees
    • Healthy 12 year old boy (Jonah)
    • Healthy experienced fisherman (Jackie)
    • Biscuits
    • Nuts
    • Mature pine trees
    • Healthy, experienced fisherman (Ben)
    • Some Bread
    • Spade
    • Native, fruit-bearing trees
    • Healthy survivalist
    • (Gabe)
    • Plastic bags
    • A large canvas sheet
    • Native, fruit bearing bushes
    • Slightly injured survivalist (Sav) (wrist)
    • Some rope
    • Terrestrial wildlife
    • Me, slightly injured (ankle)
    • Two pots
    • Fresh water stream
    • A fully charged laptop
    • Seafood in sea
  5. Immediate Term

    Slide 5 - Immediate Term

    • Our needs get confused with our wants. Our basic needs consist of three elements
    • Shelter, Water and Food.
    • These three things are the key to staying alive in the immediate term, necessities will be shared amongst the group to ensure the survival of all members and the best use of enterprise resources.
    • Shelter
    • Temporary, everyone excluding Ben to gather land resources using the machete, knives and spade.
    • Gabe and Sav will instruct on knots and structure.
    • Water
    • At night, set up a water distilling device - this will provide a small supply of water, but still insufficient
    • In immediate future we will trek to the stream for fresh water during the day. Impractical and illogical but necessary in immediate term. However, in order to do this there will be a compromise on time and quantity of food as we use labour resources.
    • Food
    • We will consume some of the bread, nuts and biscuits, but we will not consume all of it as we need to preserve some for further usage, like bait.
    • Edible fruit on surrounding trees, Jonah will climb up the tree (assisted with rope) and collect them for consumption.
    • Our wants are limitless, but as we are isolated on an island some of the wants are impractical, like phones or stereo. But there are things that are accessible like more food, bigger shelters, better clothes. But there are still limitations on resources, there is a set amount of fish and labour resources, entrepreneurial knowledge and capital resources, for example only one canvas sheet and only a couple of plastic bags.
  6. Step 1: Find a large branch and lean one end onto a tree.Step 2: Place smaller branches at 45 degree angles along the length of the large branch.

    Slide 6 - Step 1: Find a large branch and lean one end onto a tree.Step 2: Place smaller branches at 45 degree angles along the length of the large branch.

    • Step 3: Fasten the stabilisers to the main branch using rope and/or vineStep 4: Cover the entire structure with leaves, foliage and canvas sheet
    • Shelter
    • Survival – temporary shelter
    • Few resources, small amount of time
    • Covered, strong whilst protectiom from elements
    • Permanent shelter – disallows time for other activities
    • In time – convert to tepee shelter.
    • When there is ore time for allocation of labour resources
  7. Create a Solar Water Still:Step 1: Dig a hole in the sand up near the edge of the trees. You want to dig deep enough that the hole is within the damp sand underneath.Step 2: Place a container in the centre of the hole.Step 3: Fill the gaps surrounding the container with anything wet, such as wet leaves.Step 4: Place your plastic sheet over the hole and anchor the sheet in place with larger rocks around the edges of the hole.Step 5: Place one small rock in the centre of the plastic, just over the container.Step 6: Condensation will occur on the underside of the plastic and run to the centre. It will drip into the container filling it with distilled drinking water.

    Slide 7 - Create a Solar Water Still:Step 1: Dig a hole in the sand up near the edge of the trees. You want to dig deep enough that the hole is within the damp sand underneath.Step 2: Place a container in the centre of the hole.Step 3: Fill the gaps surrounding the container with anything wet, such as wet leaves.Step 4: Place your plastic sheet over the hole and anchor the sheet in place with larger rocks around the edges of the hole.Step 5: Place one small rock in the centre of the plastic, just over the container.Step 6: Condensation will occur on the underside of the plastic and run to the centre. It will drip into the container filling it with distilled drinking water.

    • Water
    • Most valuable resource
    • Salt water – not fit for consumption
    • Essential for survival
    • Some methods require time which we will have to sacrifice but at a balance
    • Water from bamboo
    • After initiation no labour required
    • Initiation does not require extensive labour, time or resources
    • Chop bamboo to 1 metre above ground
    • Carve out bowl shape in stump
    • Water will be pumped into bowl.
  8. Food

    Slide 8 - Food

    • Fruit
    • Edible fruits in the trees and on bushes. Jonah to climb, assisted by rope tied around his waist, for safety.
    • 10% of white berries are edible
    • 50% of red berries are edible
    • 90% blue, black and purple berries are safe to eat.
    • Remember, If an animal eats it doesn’t mean you can eat it.
    • Meat
    • Make noose-like snares using vines. Conserve energy and time so opportunity cost low. Use vines as rope better used for shelter. Cook on fire.
    • Fish
    • Make spear out of branch – cook on fire.
  9. Fire

    Slide 9 - Fire

    • Fire is a necessity for us to survive – keep warm and cook food
    • Start fire with lens from my glasses
    • Water on lens
    • Direct captured sunlight to pile of tinder
    • Fire is not a priority, the resources and time required would be more beneficial for shelter and other aspects.
  10. Short Term

    Slide 10 - Short Term

    • Majority of time and resources spent on needs
    • Make food and water collection more efficient
    • Improve shelter
    • Luxuries to be added to camp:
    • Food
    • Snares and traps for wildlife
    • Improvement on climbing gear
    • Fishing spears (sharpened branches) and fishing nets (braided fronds)
    • Water
    • Additional distilling devices
    • Make clay pots for storage
    • Personal health
    • Long drops - large deep hole dug, covered by palm fronds, will be filled in and new hole dug every 5 days.
    • Hammocks and floor covering – made from braided palm fronds
  11. Slide 11

    • Dig up clay soil on the riparian fringe of the river,
    • Transport back to camp
    • Leave out to dry
    • Grind out rigid clay to a powder with a rock
    • Slowly wet the powder and sculpt the pot and container
    • Set out to dry
    • Scorch the inside of pot
    • Opportunity cost is present as the 8 hour journey, carrying pots and clay, and sculpting the pot requires a large amount of energy whilst also limiting the other activities for that day.
    • To prepare for this we will store food over previous days.
    • Additional Knives
    • Sharpen sticks to simulate a spear.
    • Rope
    • Valuable material. Rope substituted for vine in less important locations.
    • Food
    • Finite supply, therefore we must collect our own, once the biscuits, nuts and bread runs out we will hunt and forage for other food.
    • Plastic bags and Canvas Sheet
    • Substitute with palm fronds, leaves and other foliage for shelter and water distilling duties.
    • Making clay pots
    • Additional Resources
  12. Long Term

    Slide 12 - Long Term

    • Liveable conditions and adequate luxury
    • Arrange to leave.
    • Sacrifice the opportunity of improved beds and better living conditions
    • Returning
    • Significant knowledge of the island
    • Created migration maps
    • Tide prediction charts
    • Familiarity of island.
    • Goal must be to leave.
    • Maximise chance of being rescued, meanwhile build our boat.
    • Move shelter to the beach to maximise visibility
    • Inscribe messages and show signs of us on the beach for passing planes
    • Fire burning 24/7
    • The opportunity cost of this is relatively high due to the large amount of fuel (wood) and time that would be required.
    • Injured will have recovered to take over these duties.
    • Construct a well sized boat for us to travel to the neighbouring Pacific islands, raft not powerful or strong enough.
    • The opportunity cost of leaving is the fact that water and food supplies will be harder to obtain and rationed, whilst also sacrificing other privileges. On the other hand, waiting to be rescued could take years, this is why I believe leaving is more beneficial for us.
  13. Our plan from the start was to leave, however, we don’t have the knowledge or resources to leave in the immediate, or even short term.

    Slide 13 - Our plan from the start was to leave, however, we don’t have the knowledge or resources to leave in the immediate, or even short term.

    • We cannot use all our collected resources for the boat, and we cannot waste our currently low levels of energy for anything other than survival purposes. This is because there is a scarcity of time, resources and energy, thus our need for conservation of resources when needed. In saying that, excess materials will be set aside for the raft if not needed.
  14. The two things you will need to create a raft are logs and vine. Luckily we have vine, but also a superior material, rope. We will use our fishing boat as a base and follow these instructions to improve its stability. We will also carve paddles to take us to the destination faster and to give us control of the boat, this is a better outcome than sacrificing the wood for a bigger boat.Step 1: Collect 10 to 20 logs and tree trunks that are no more than 12 inches in diameter.Step 2: Find a few smaller logs to use as braces.Step 3: Cut notches in the logs in the places where your vine will be looped to hold each log together.Step 4: Begin interweaving the vine into the notches of the logs. Over and under lapping from one log to the next.Step 5: When the entire structure is finished, tie off.

    Slide 14 - The two things you will need to create a raft are logs and vine. Luckily we have vine, but also a superior material, rope. We will use our fishing boat as a base and follow these instructions to improve its stability. We will also carve paddles to take us to the destination faster and to give us control of the boat, this is a better outcome than sacrificing the wood for a bigger boat.Step 1: Collect 10 to 20 logs and tree trunks that are no more than 12 inches in diameter.Step 2: Find a few smaller logs to use as braces.Step 3: Cut notches in the logs in the places where your vine will be looped to hold each log together.Step 4: Begin interweaving the vine into the notches of the logs. Over and under lapping from one log to the next.Step 5: When the entire structure is finished, tie off.

    • Building a raft
  15. Fisherman

    Slide 15 - Fisherman

    • Immediate concerns are survival, and short term is creating liveable conditions. Although, towards the end a large portion of time is spent building the raft, these changes are represented in the data.
  16. Survivalist

    Slide 16 - Survivalist

    • Once again, his focus and time spent on certain activities changes as time goes on. Setting up traps and survival items is replaced with building the escape raft.