NCCER Elc. L1/M1 MIX

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NCCER Elc. L1/M1 MIX

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  1. Objectives

    Slide 2 - Objectives

    • When trainees have completed this session, they should be able to do the following:
    • 1. Recognize safe working practices in the construction environment.
    • 2. Explain the purpose of OSHA and how it promotes safety on the job.
    • 3. Identify electrical hazards and how to avoid or minimize them in the workplace.
    • 4. Explain electrical safety issues concerning lockout/tagout procedures, confined space entry, respiratory protection, and fall protection systems.
    • 5. Develop a task plan and a hazard assessment for a given task and select the appropriate PPE and work methods to safely perform the task.  
    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
  2. Performance Tasks

    Slide 3 - Performance Tasks

    • 1. Perform a visual inspection on various types of ladders.
    • 2. Set up a ladder properly to perform a task.
    • 3. Properly don a harness.
    • 4. Perform a hazard assessment of a job such as replacing the lights in your classroom.
    • • Discuss the work to be performed and the hazards involved.
    • • Locate the phone closest to the work site and ensure that the local emergency telephone numbers are either posted at the phone or known by you and your partner(s).
    • • Plan an escape route from the location in the event of an accident.  
    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
  3. 1.0.0

    Slide 4 - 1.0.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • What’s wrong with this picture?
  4. 2.0.0

    Slide 5 - 2.0.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Electrical Shock
    • • The most life-threatening hazards on a construction site are falls, being crushed by falling materials or equipment, electric shock, and being struck by flying objects or moving equipment. Most accidents are preventable if safety precautions are followed.
    • • Effects of electrical contact include heart fibrillation, cardiac arrest, and burns.
  5. 2.1.0 – 2.1.2

    Slide 6 - 2.1.0 – 2.1.2

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Body Resistance
    • • Shock occurs when the body becomes part of an electric circuit.
    • • The effects of electric shock depend on the amount of current, its path through the body, and the length of exposure.
    • • Shocks often result in internal burns or bleeding, and other injuries including burns and falls.
  6. 2.1.0

    Slide 7 - 2.1.0

    • Low Voltage is considered to be anything less than 600v
    • 600v and more is ten times as likely to result in a fatality.
    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
  7. 2.1.1

    Slide 8 - 2.1.1

    • An outside electric current of as little as 75 milliamperes can upset the rhythmic, coordinated beating of the heart by disturbing the nerve impulses.
    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
  8. 3.0.0

    Slide 9 - 3.0.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Reducing Your Risk
    • • Limited approach boundaries have been established to provide minimum safe clearance distances to live parts.
    • • Only trained and qualified individuals may cross a limited approach boundary.
    • • Always follow company safety policies as well as OSHA and NFPA standards.
  9. 3.1.0

    Slide 10 - 3.1.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Protective Equipment
    • • OSHA CFR 1910.335(a) lists requirements for protective equipment.
    • • Personal protective equipment must be worn wherever there is a risk of electrical hazards.
  10. 3.1.1 – 3.3.0

    Slide 11 - 3.1.1 – 3.3.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Equipment Inspection and Safety Precautions
    • • Rubber protective equipment is color coded by voltage class. Daily inspection and biannual testing are necessary to ensure safety, and before each use.
    • • Other protective equipment includes hot sticks, fuse pullers, shorting probes, and eye/face protection.
    • • Always verify the absence of voltage before working on a circuit (live-dead-live test).
    • • Never work outside of the planned scope. Stop and reassess safety first.
  11. 3.1.1

    Slide 12 - 3.1.1

    • Classifications of Rubber Protection Equipment
    • Class 00 (beige) 500V
    • Class 0 (red) 1,000V
    • Class 1 (white) 7,500V
    • Class 2 (yellow) 17,000V
    • Class 3 (green) 26,500V
    • Class 4 (orange) 36,000V
    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
  12. 3.1.6

    Slide 13 - 3.1.6

    • Before working on de-energized circuits that have a capacitor installed, you must discharge the capacitor using a safety shorting probe.
    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
  13. 3.2.0

    Slide 14 - 3.2.0

    • You should always assume that all the circuits are energized until you have verified that the circuits is de-energized. This is called the live-dead-live test.
    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
  14. 4.0.0 – 5.0.0

    Slide 15 - 4.0.0 – 5.0.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • OSHA; NFPA 70E®
    • • The purpose of OSHA is to ensure a safe and healthy working environment.
    • • OSHA publishes many standards, including CFR 1910, for general industry, and CFR 1926, for the construction industry.
    • • OSHA electrical regulations require that all tools be either grounded or double-insulated.
  15. 4.0.0 – 5.0.0

    Slide 16 - 4.0.0 – 5.0.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Typical GFCI Receptacle
    • • Receptacles other than 125V, single-phase, 15A, 20A, and 30A should be ground fault protected if possible.
    • • In lieu of a GFCI receptacle, an assured equipment grounding conductor program must be in place.
  16. 4.0.0 – 5.0.0

    Slide 17 - 4.0.0 – 5.0.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • OSHA Lockout/Tagout Rule
    • • All sources of energy must be locked out and tagged prior to equipment service or maintenance. This includes all sources of electric, mechanical, hydraulic, thermal, and chemical energy.
    • • Always follow the lockout/tagout procedure for the specific job site.
  17. 4.0.0 – 5.0.0

    Slide 18 - 4.0.0 – 5.0.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Multiple Lockout/Tagout Device
    • • Each authorized employee must affix a separate lock and key.
    • • OSHA has specific procedures that must be followed for emergency removal of a lockout/tagout device.
    • • In addition to OSHA regulations, employers/employees must understand and follow the requirements of NFPA 70E®.
  18. 4.0.0 – 5.0.0

    Slide 19 - 4.0.0 – 5.0.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • What’s wrong with this picture?
    • Next Session…
    • Ladders and Scaffolds; Lifts, Hoists, and Cranes
  19. 6.0.0 – 7.0.0

    Slide 20 - 6.0.0 – 7.0.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Ladders and Scaffolds; Lifts, Hoists, and Cranes
    • • Ladders must be inspected before each use.
    • • Never climb a damaged ladder.
  20. 6.0.0 – 7.0.0

    Slide 21 - 6.0.0 – 7.0.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Ladder Positioning
    • • When positioning a straight ladder, the horizontal distance from the ladder feet to the wall should be one-fourth the working height of the ladder. Side rails should extend beyond the top support by 36 inches.
    • • Always lock the spreaders on a stepladder and never stand on the top two rungs.
    • Performance Tasks
    • Perform a visual inspection on various types of ladders and set up a ladder properly to perform a task.
    • This session will conclude with trainees performing a visual inspection on various types of ladders and setting up a ladder properly to perform a task.
  21. 6.0.0 – 7.0.0

    Slide 22 - 6.0.0 – 7.0.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • What’s wrong with this picture?
  22. 6.0.0 – 7.0.0

    Slide 23 - 6.0.0 – 7.0.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Scaffolding and Lift Equipment
    • • Scaffolding must be erected and inspected by qualified individuals. It must be straight and plumb, with a sound footing and proper decking, toeboards, and guardrails.
    • • Exercise extreme caution when working in the vicinity of lifts, hoists, and cranes. Never assume that the operator can see you. Never stand or walk under a load.
  23. 6.0.0 – 7.0.0

    Slide 24 - 6.0.0 – 7.0.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • What’s wrong with this picture?
  24. 8.0.0

    Slide 25 - 8.0.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Lifting
    • • Always lift with your legs, not your back.
    • • Avoid lifting objects over your head.
    • • Ask for help with heavy loads.
    • • Never lift over the side or tailgate of a pickup truck.
    • • Go around obstructions when carrying a load. Never step over objects.
  25. 8.0.0

    Slide 26 - 8.0.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • What’s wrong with this picture?
  26. 9.0.0 – 9.1.0

    Slide 27 - 9.0.0 – 9.1.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Basic Tool Safety
    • • Only use tools for their intended purpose.
    • • Inspect tools regularly. Repair or replace damaged tools.
    • • Keep tools sharp.
    • • Wear protective equipment when using hand tools.
  27. 9.2.0

    Slide 28 - 9.2.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Power Tool Safety
    • • Power tools can be operated using electricity, pneumatics, liquid fuels, or hydraulic energy.
    • • Never operate any tool unless you are qualified to do so. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for use and maintenance.
    • • Never alter or defeat the safety equipment on a power tool.
    • • Wear protective equipment when using power tools.
  28. 10.0.0 – 11.0.0

    Slide 29 - 10.0.0 – 11.0.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Confined Space Entry Procedures; First Aid
    • • A confined space has a limited means of entry and exit and may contain a hazardous atmosphere or engulfment hazard. Confined spaces may be permit required or non-permit required. Confined-space entry requires a formal hazard review and rescue plan.
    • • Emergency numbers must be readily available on every job site.
  29. 10.1.0

    Slide 30 - 10.1.0

    • At the end of the shift, the entry permits must be made part of the job journal and retained for one year.
    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
  30. 10.2.0

    Slide 31 - 10.2.0

    • Before determining the proper procedure for confined space entry, a hazard review shall be performed.
    • Entry & Inspection of hazards
    • Past and Current uses of confined space
    • Proximity to other hazards
    • Potential for mechanical/electrical hazards
    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
  31. 12.0.0 – 16.0.0

    Slide 32 - 12.0.0 – 16.0.0

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Solvents and Toxic Vapors; Asbestos; Batteries; PCBs and Vapor Lamps; Lead Safety
    • • All materials that present health hazards must have a safety data sheet (SDS) on site that lists PPE and safe use, storage, and disposal instructions.
    • • Common hazardous materials include solvents, asbestos, batteries, PCBs, and lead.
    • • Wear all appropriate PPE, including respiratory protection, when working near toxic materials.
  32. 12.2.0

    Slide 33 - 12.2.0

    • If you are required to use a respirators protective device, you must be evaluated by a physician to ensure that you are physically fit to use a respirator.
    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
  33. 14.0.0

    Slide 34 - 14.0.0

    • Batteries often give off hydrogen gas as a byproduct.
    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
  34. 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    Slide 35 - 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Fall Protection
    • • All employees must receive annual training in fall protection when there is the possibility that they will be exposed to a fall of six feet or more.
    • • Fall protection may include guardrails, personal fall arrest systems (PFAS), or controlled access zones.
  35. 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    Slide 36 - 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Complex Guardrail System
    • OSHA has specific construction requirements for guardrail systems.
  36. 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    Slide 37 - 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • What’s wrong with this picture?
  37. 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    Slide 38 - 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Personal Fall Arrest Systems (PFAS)
    • • PFAS equipment must be worn when working 6 feet or more above the ground. It consists of a full-body harness, lanyards, and one or more anchor points.
    • • PFAS equipment must be inspected before each use and discarded if involved in a fall.
  38. 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    Slide 39 - 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • What’s wrong with this picture?
  39. 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    Slide 40 - 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Proper Fall Protection on a Boom Lift
    • • Retractable lanyards keep the line out of the way for safety when close to the ground or in a tight area.
    • • Do not put a shock absorber in line with a retractable lanyard.
  40. 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    Slide 41 - 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • What’s wrong with this picture?
  41. 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    Slide 42 - 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Required Free Lengths for Various Lanyards
    • • When assessing a location for fall protection, examine the space below to ensure that it is clear of any obstructions.
    • • Use Table 3 to determine the minimum distance between any hazard/obstruction and the worker or attachment point.
  42. 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    Slide 43 - 17.0.0 – 17.1.3

    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
    • Controlled Access Zone
    • • Controlled access zones are used where a guardrail cannot be attached to the building.
    • • A controlled access zone must be located a minimum of six feet from the edge.
    • Performance Task
    • Properly don a harness and perform a hazard assessment.
    • This session will conclude with practicing properly donning a harness and performing a hazard assessment of a job.
  43. Wrap Up

    Slide 44 - Wrap Up

    • 3-2-1
    • 3 – Write 3 important things learned during class
    • 2 – Write 2 questions you have about the material
    • 1 – Write 1 thought you had about the material
    • Electrical Safety 26102-14
  44. Next Session…

    Slide 45 - Next Session…

    • MODULE EXAM
    • Review the complete module to prepare for the module exam. Complete the Module Review as a study aid.
    • Electrical Safety 26102-14