SURVEY OF EPH GAL PHIL AND COL AUDIO

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SURVEY OF EPH GAL PHIL AND COL AUDIO

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  1. 2015 Spring Study

    Slide 1 - 2015 Spring Study

    • “Preparing For The Future”
    • SURVEYING THE NEW TESTAMENT
  2. Galatians, Epistle to

    Slide 3 - Galatians, Epistle to

    • — The genuineness of this epistle is not called in question. Its Pauline origin is universally acknowledged.
    • Occasion of. The churches of Galatia were founded by Paul himself (Acts 16:6; Gal 1:8; 4:13,19). They seem to have been composed mainly of converts from heathenism (4:8), but partly also of Jewish converts, who probably, under the influence of Judaizing teachers, sought to incorporate the rites of Judaism with Christianity, and by their active zeal had succeeded in inducing the majority of the churches to adopt their views (1:6; 3:1). This epistle was written for the purpose of counteracting this Judaizing tendency, and of recalling the Galatians to the simplicity of the gospel, and at the same time also of vindicating Paul's claim to be a divinely-commissioned apostle.
  3. Time and place of writing. The epistle was probably written very soon after Paul's second visit to Galatia (Acts 18:23). The references of the epistle appear to agree with this conclusion. The visit to Jerusalem, mentioned in Gal 2:1-10, was identical with that of Acts 15, and it is spoken of as a thing of the past, and consequently the epistle was written subsequently to the council of Jerusalem. The similarity between this epistle and that to the Romans has led to the conclusion that they were both written at the same time, namely, in the winter of A.D. 57 A.D. - 58 A.D., during Paul's stay in Corinth (Acts 20:2,3). This to the Galatians is written on the urgency of the occasion, tidings having reached him of the state of matters; and that to the Romans in a more deliberate and systematic way, in exposition of the same great doctrines of the gospel.

    Slide 4 - Time and place of writing. The epistle was probably written very soon after Paul's second visit to Galatia (Acts 18:23). The references of the epistle appear to agree with this conclusion. The visit to Jerusalem, mentioned in Gal 2:1-10, was identical with that of Acts 15, and it is spoken of as a thing of the past, and consequently the epistle was written subsequently to the council of Jerusalem. The similarity between this epistle and that to the Romans has led to the conclusion that they were both written at the same time, namely, in the winter of A.D. 57 A.D. - 58 A.D., during Paul's stay in Corinth (Acts 20:2,3). This to the Galatians is written on the urgency of the occasion, tidings having reached him of the state of matters; and that to the Romans in a more deliberate and systematic way, in exposition of the same great doctrines of the gospel.

    • Contents of. The great question discussed is, Was the Jewish law binding on Christians? The epistle is designed to prove against the Jews that men are justified by faith without the works of the law of Moses. After an introductory address (Gal 1:1-10) the apostle discusses the subjects which had occasioned the epistle. (1) He defends his apostolic authority (1:11-19; 2:1-14); (2) shows the evil influence of the Judaizers in destroying the very essence of the gospel (3 and 4); (3) exhorts the Galatian believers to stand fast in the faith as it is in Jesus, and to abound in the fruits of the Spirit, and in a right use of their Christian freedom (5-6:1-10); (4) and then concludes with a summary of the topics discussed, and with the benediction.
  4. The Epistle to the Galatians and that to the Romans taken together "form a complete proof that justification is not to be obtained meritoriously either by works of morality or by rites and ceremonies, though of divine appointment; but that it is a free gift, proceeding entirely from the mercy of God, to those who receive it by faith in Jesus our Lord."

    Slide 5 - The Epistle to the Galatians and that to the Romans taken together "form a complete proof that justification is not to be obtained meritoriously either by works of morality or by rites and ceremonies, though of divine appointment; but that it is a free gift, proceeding entirely from the mercy of God, to those who receive it by faith in Jesus our Lord."

    • In the conclusion of the epistle (6:11) Paul says, "Ye see how large a letter I have written with mine own hand." It is implied that this was different from his ordinary usage, which was simply to write the concluding salutation with his own hand, indicating that the rest of the epistle was written by another hand. Regarding this conclusion, Lightfoot, in his Commentary on the epistle, says: "At this point the apostle takes the pen from his amanuensis, and the concluding paragraph is written with his own hand. From the time when letters began to be forged in his name (2 Thess 2:2; 3:17) it seems to have been his practice to close with a few words in his own handwriting, as a precaution against such forgeries...In the present case he writes a whole paragraph, summing up the main lessons of the epistle in terse, eager, disjointed sentences. He writes it, too, in large, bold characters, that his hand-writing may reflect the energy and determination of his soul."
  5. Galatians

    Slide 6 - Galatians

    • I. Introduction (1:1-5)
    • II. The apostolic vindication (1:6-2:21)
    • A. The occasion (1:6-7)
    • B. The authenticity of his gospel (1:8-10)
    • C. The divine origin (1:11-24)
    • D. The official endorsement (2:1-10)
    • E. The explanation of his conduct (2:11-21)
  6. III.	Doctrinal justification		(3-4)

    Slide 7 - III. Doctrinal justification (3-4)

    • A. The faulty conduct of the Galatians (3:1-5)
    • B. Abraham's example (3:6-9)
    • C. Legal deliverance by Christ (3:10-14)
    • D. The purpose of the law (3:15-18)
    • E. Law related to the promise (3:19-22)
    • F. Superiority of the condition under faith compared with that
    • under law (3:23-4:11)
    • G. Paul and the Galatians (4:12-20)
    • H. The two covenants (4:21-31)
  7. IV.	The practical application		(5:1-6:10)

    Slide 8 - IV. The practical application (5:1-6:10)

    • A. Warning of the right use of freedom (5:1-15)
    • B. The way to spiritual growth (5:16-26)
    • C. Exhortation to patience and brotherly love (6:1-5)
    • D. Exhortation to liberality (6:6-10)
    • E. Warning against Judaizers (6:11-16)
    • V. Conclusion (6:17-18)
  8. Slide 9

    • Gal 1:6-9
    • 6 I marvel that you are turning away so soon from Him who called you in the grace of Christ, to a different gospel,
    • 7 which is not another; but there are some who trouble you and want to pervert the gospel of Christ.
    • 8 But even if we, or an angel from heaven, preach any other gospel to you than what we have preached to you, let him be accursed.
    • 9 As we have said before, so now I say again, if anyone preaches any other gospel to you than what you have received, let him be accursed.
  9. Ephesians — was written by Paul at Rome about the same time as that to the Colossians, which in many points it resembles.

    Slide 10 - Ephesians — was written by Paul at Rome about the same time as that to the Colossians, which in many points it resembles.

    • Contents of. The Epistle to the Colossians is mainly polemical, designed to refute certain theosophic errors that had crept into the church there. That to the Ephesians does not seem to have originated in any special circumstances, but is simply a letter springing from Paul's love to the church there, and indicative of his earnest desire that they should be fully instructed in the profound doctrines of the gospel. It contains (1) the salutation (1:1,2);
  10. (2) a general description of the blessings the gospel reveals, as to their source, means by which they are attained, purpose for which they are bestowed, and their final result, with a fervent prayer for the further spiritual enrichment of the Ephesians (1:3-2:10); (3) "a record of that marked change in spiritual position which the Gentile believers now possessed, ending with an account of the writer's selection to and qualification for the apostolate of heathendom, a fact so considered as to keep them from being dispirited, and to lead him to pray for enlarged spiritual benefactions on his absent sympathizers" (2:12-3:21);

    Slide 11 - (2) a general description of the blessings the gospel reveals, as to their source, means by which they are attained, purpose for which they are bestowed, and their final result, with a fervent prayer for the further spiritual enrichment of the Ephesians (1:3-2:10); (3) "a record of that marked change in spiritual position which the Gentile believers now possessed, ending with an account of the writer's selection to and qualification for the apostolate of heathendom, a fact so considered as to keep them from being dispirited, and to lead him to pray for enlarged spiritual benefactions on his absent sympathizers" (2:12-3:21);

  11. (4) a chapter on unity as undisturbed by diversity of gifts (4:1-16); (5) special injunctions bearing on ordinary life (4:17-6:10); (6) the imagery of a spiritual warfare, mission of Tychicus, and valedictory blessing (6:11-24)

    Slide 12 - (4) a chapter on unity as undisturbed by diversity of gifts (4:1-16); (5) special injunctions bearing on ordinary life (4:17-6:10); (6) the imagery of a spiritual warfare, mission of Tychicus, and valedictory blessing (6:11-24)

  12. Ephesians

    Slide 13 - Ephesians

    • I. Salutation (1:1-2)
    • II. The believer's position in Christ (1:3-3:21)
    • A. The elements of his position (1:1-14)
    • B. Prayer for knowledge and faith to appropriate the power of the position (1:15-21)
    • C. Christ the Head of the church (1:22-23)
    • D. Method of Gentile salvation (2:1-10)
    • E. Union of Jew and Gentile in Christ (2:11-18)
    • F. The church as a temple inhabited by the Spirit (2:19-22)
  13. Ephesians

    Slide 14 - Ephesians

    • III. The church as a special divine revelation (3:1-12)
    • A. Hidden in past ages (3:1-6)
    • B. Revealed especially to the apostle Paul (3:7-12)
    • C. Second prayer for knowledge and faith to appropriate the power of the position (3:13-21)
    • IV. The walk of the believer in Christ (4:1-6:9)
    • A. The walk worthy (4:1-3)
    • B. The walk as an expression of doctrinal unity (4:4-6)
  14. Ephesians

    Slide 15 - Ephesians

    • C. The walk as a ministry of gifts (4:7-16)
    • D. The walk as a regenerated man (4:17-29)
    • E. The walk of the believer indwelt by the Spirit (4:30-32)
    • F. The walk as a child in God's family (5)
    • G. The walk of children and servants (6:1-9)
  15. Ephesians

    Slide 16 - Ephesians

    • V. The warfare of the Spirit-filled believer in Christ (6:10-22)
    • A. His power (6:10)
    • B. His armor (6:11)
    • C. His foes (6:12-17)
    • D. His resources (6:18-22)
    • VI. Benediction (6:23-24)
  16. Philippians, Epistle to — was written by Paul during the two years when he was "in bonds" in Rome (Phil 1:7-13), probably early in the year A.D. 62 A.D. or in the end of 61.

    Slide 17 - Philippians, Epistle to — was written by Paul during the two years when he was "in bonds" in Rome (Phil 1:7-13), probably early in the year A.D. 62 A.D. or in the end of 61.

    • The Philippians had sent Epaphroditus, their messenger, with contributions to meet the necessities of the apostle; and on his return Paul sent back with him this letter. With this precious communication Epaphroditus sets out on his homeward journey. "The joy caused by his return, and the effect of this wonderful letter when first read in the church of Philippi, are hidden from us. And we may almost say that with this letter the church itself passes from our view. To-day, in silent meadows, quiet cattle browse among the ruins which mark the site of what was once the flourishing Roman colony of Philippi, the home of the most attractive church of the apostolic age.
  17. PHILIPPINES

    Slide 18 - PHILIPPINES

    • But the name and fame and spiritual influence of that church will never pass. To myriads of men and women in every age and nation the letter written in a dungeon at Rome, and carried along the Egnatian Way by an obscure Christian messenger, has been a light divine and a cheerful guide along the most rugged paths of life" (Professor Beet).
    • The church at Philippi was the first-fruits of European Christianity. Their attachment to the apostle was very fervent, and so also was his affection for them. They alone of all the churches helped him by their contributions, which he gratefully acknowledges (Acts 20:33-35; 2 Cor 11:7-12; 2 Thess 3:8).
  18. PHILIPPINES

    Slide 19 - PHILIPPINES

    • The financial liberality of the Philippians comes out very conspicuously (Phil 4:15). "This was a characteristic of the Macedonian missions, as 2 Cor 8 and 9 amply and beautifully prove. It is remarkable that the Macedonian converts were, as a class, very poor (2 Cor 8:2); and the parallel facts, their poverty and their open-handed support of the great missionary and his work, are deeply harmonious. At the present day the missionary liberality of poor Christians is, in proportion, really greater than that of the rich"
  19. I.	Salutation	(1:1-2)

    Slide 20 - I. Salutation (1:1-2)

    • II. The believer's joy in spite of suffering (1:3-30)
    • III. The believer's example in Christ of joyous and loyal service (2)
    • A. Exhortation to unity and meekness (2:1-4)
    • B. Christ's humiliation (2:5-8)
    • C. Christ's exaltation (2:9-11)
    • D. Manifestation of practical salvation (2:12-16)
    • E. Paul's example (2:17-30)
  20. Philippians

    Slide 21 - Philippians

    • V. Christ, the believer's joy, giving victory over worry (4:1-22)
    • A. Exhortation to united joy (4:1-4)
    • B. The peace of God, the key to joy (4:5-7)
    • C. The presence of God in practical joy (4:8-22)
    • VI. Benediction (4:23)
  21. Colossians, Epistle to the — was written by Paul at Rome during his first imprisonment there (Acts 28:16,30), probably in the spring of A.D. 57 A.D., or, as some think, 62 A.D., and soon after he had written his Epistle to the Ephesians. Like some of his other epistles (e.g., those to Corinth), this seems to have been written in consequence of information which had somehow been conveyed to him of the internal state of the church there (Col 1:4-8). Its object was to counteract false teaching.

    Slide 22 - Colossians, Epistle to the — was written by Paul at Rome during his first imprisonment there (Acts 28:16,30), probably in the spring of A.D. 57 A.D., or, as some think, 62 A.D., and soon after he had written his Epistle to the Ephesians. Like some of his other epistles (e.g., those to Corinth), this seems to have been written in consequence of information which had somehow been conveyed to him of the internal state of the church there (Col 1:4-8). Its object was to counteract false teaching.

  22. A large part of it is directed against certain speculatists who attempted to combine the doctrines of Oriental mysticism and asceticism with Christianity, thereby promising the disciples the enjoyment of a higher spiritual life and a deeper insight into the world of spirits. Paul argues against such teaching, showing that in Christ Jesus they had all things. He sets forth the majesty of his redemption. The mention of the "new moon" and "sabbath days" (2:16) shows also that there were here Judaizing teachers who sought to draw away the disciples from the simplicity of the gospel.

    Slide 23 - A large part of it is directed against certain speculatists who attempted to combine the doctrines of Oriental mysticism and asceticism with Christianity, thereby promising the disciples the enjoyment of a higher spiritual life and a deeper insight into the world of spirits. Paul argues against such teaching, showing that in Christ Jesus they had all things. He sets forth the majesty of his redemption. The mention of the "new moon" and "sabbath days" (2:16) shows also that there were here Judaizing teachers who sought to draw away the disciples from the simplicity of the gospel.

    • Like most of Paul's epistles, this consists of two parts, a doctrinal and a practical.
  23. (1.) The doctrinal part comprises the first two chapters. His main theme is developed in chapter 2. He warns them against being drawn away from Him in whom dwelt all the fulness of the Godhead, and who was the head of all spiritual powers. Christ was the head of the body of which they were members; and if they were truly united to him, what needed they more?

    Slide 24 - (1.) The doctrinal part comprises the first two chapters. His main theme is developed in chapter 2. He warns them against being drawn away from Him in whom dwelt all the fulness of the Godhead, and who was the head of all spiritual powers. Christ was the head of the body of which they were members; and if they were truly united to him, what needed they more?

    • (2.) The practical part of the epistle (3-4) enforces various duties naturally flowing from the doctrines expounded. They are exhorted to mind things that are above (3:1-4), to mortify every evil principle of their nature, and to put on the new man (3:5-14). Many special duties of the Christian life are also insisted upon as the fitting evidence of the Christian character. Tychicus was the bearer of the letter, as he was also of that to the Ephesians and to Philemon, and he would tell them of the state of the apostle (4:7-9).
  24. After friendly greetings (10-14), he bids them interchange this letter with that he had sent to the neighbouring church of Laodicea. He then closes this brief but striking epistle with his usual autograph salutation. There is a remarkable resemblance between this epistle and that to the Ephesians (q.v.). The genuineness of this epistle has not been called in question.

    Slide 25 - After friendly greetings (10-14), he bids them interchange this letter with that he had sent to the neighbouring church of Laodicea. He then closes this brief but striking epistle with his usual autograph salutation. There is a remarkable resemblance between this epistle and that to the Ephesians (q.v.). The genuineness of this epistle has not been called in question.

    • Colossians
  25. Colossians

    Slide 26 - Colossians

    • I. Introduction (1:1-12)
    • II. Doctrinal exposition (1:13-2:3)
    • A. Redemption (1:13-14)
    • B. Person of Christ (1:15-19)
    • C. The work of Christ (1:20-23)
    • D. The apostle's participation in Christ's program (1:24-2:3)
  26. Colossians

    Slide 27 - Colossians

    • III. Doctrinal polemicism (2:4-3:4)
    • A. Against false philosophy (2:4-8)
    • B. In behalf of the Person and work of Christ (2:9-15)
    • C. Resulting obligations (2:16-3:4)
    • IV. Doctrinal practice (3:5-4:6)
    • A. Practical appropriation of the death and resurrection of Christ (3:5-17)
    • B. Appropriation of Christ's death and resurrection in domestic life (3:18-4:1)
    • C. Appropriation of the death and resurrectionin relation to the world (4:2-6)
  27. Colossians

    Slide 28 - Colossians

    • V. Personal matters (4:7-17)
    • A. The mission of Tychicus and Onesimus (4:7-9)
    • B. Salutations from Paul's associates (4:10-14)
    • C. Paul's own greetings (4:15)
    • D. The Laodicean message (4:16-17)
    • VI. Conclusion (4:18)
  28. THOUGH THESE EPISTLES OR LETTERS ARE SHORT THEY ARE PACKED WITH GOOD INFORMATION.

    Slide 29 - THOUGH THESE EPISTLES OR LETTERS ARE SHORT THEY ARE PACKED WITH GOOD INFORMATION.

    • THEY ALL DESERVE OUR CAREFUL AND ERNEST STUDY.
  29. Outline of Future 2014 Sessions

    Slide 30 - Outline of Future 2014 Sessions

    • JANUARY 2015
    • 19 Orientation
    • 26 Inspiration of Scripture
    • FEBRUARY
    • 2 Genesis Though Deuteronomy 9 Joshua Through 2 Chronicles 16 The Prophets
    • 23 The Old Testament Poetry
    • MARCH
    • NEW TESTAMENT SURVEY
    • 2 The Synoptic Gospels
    • 9 The Gospel of John
    • 16 Acts
    • 23 A Survey of Romans
    • 30 A Survey of 1st and 2nd Corinthians
    • APRIL
    • 6 A Survey of Galatians, Ephesians, Colossians,
    • Philippines.
    • 13 1st and 2nd Thessalonians, Philemon 20 1s and 2nd Timothy and Titus
    • 27 James
    • MAY
    • 4 Hebrews
    • 11 1st and 2nd Peter, Jude
    • 18 1st 2nd 3rd John
    • 25 Revelation
    • JUNE
    • 1 The Life of Christ Part 1
    • 8 The Life of Christ Part 2
    • 15 The Life of Christ Part 3
    • 22 The Teachings of Christ Part 1
    • 29 The Teachings of Christ Part 2
  30. Outline of Future 2014 Sessions

    Slide 31 - Outline of Future 2014 Sessions

    • JULY 2015
    • 6 The Gospel of Christ
    • 13 Examples of Conversion
    • 20 Process of Conversion Part 1
    • 27 Process of Conversion Part 2
    • AUGUST
    • 3 “I’m A New Man” (New Creature)
    • 10 The Christ, The Cross, and The
    • Church
    • 17 The Establishment of The Church
    • 24 The Identity of The Church
    • 31 New Testament Worship
    • SEPTEMBER
    • 7 Authority, The Pattern, and
    • Innovation (1)
    • 14 Authority, The Pattern, and
    • Innovation (2)
    • 21 Authority, The Pattern, and
    • Innovation (3)
    • 28 Basis For Christian Unity
    • OCTOBER
    • 5 Fellowship
    • 12 Spiritual Gifts and Miracles
    • 19 Church Government
    • 26 Church Discipline
    • NOVEMBER
    • 2 Discipleship
    • 9 Works of Flesh and Fruits of Spirit
    • 16 Love & The Law of Love
    • 23 CLOSED FOR HOLIDAY
    • 30 The Christian Graces
    • DECEMBER
    • 7 The Devil and Temptation
    • 14 The Holy Spirit