Professor Ricks - 1L Brief Research

5 Steps to Effective Brief Research

1.0x

Professor Ricks - 1L Brief Research

Created 3 years ago

Duration 0:47:31
lesson view count 39
5 Steps to Effective Brief Research
Select the file type you wish to download
Slide Content
  1. Federal Constitutional Research

    Slide 1 - Federal Constitutional Research

    • Professor Sarah Ricks -Spring 2015
    • Getting Started
  2. Purpose:  Provide efficient and effective research strategies to help you get a jumpstart on your 4th Amendment/excessive force research.

    Slide 2 - Purpose: Provide efficient and effective research strategies to help you get a jumpstart on your 4th Amendment/excessive force research.

    • Process: We will discuss how to get started; using the tools within your documents, search strategies and Shepard’s
    • Payoff: Have a specific plan in place to attack this problem and spend less time researching and more time analyzing the law and formulating persuasive arguments.
    • 2
    • Agenda
  3. Use the record!!!

    Slide 3 - Use the record!!!

    • Does the record provide you with any key cases or statutes?
    • There may be a lower court opinion that will be key to addressing the legal issues and will include some of the central cases and statutes at issue
    • Pull those cases/statutes first!
    • 3
    • Step #1 – Use the Record
  4. Why should you care about finding a secondary source:

    Slide 4 - Why should you care about finding a secondary source:

    • Educate yourself on the law
    • Find primary authority
    • Terminology
    • Evolution of the law
    • 4
    • Step #2 – Find a Secondary Source
  5. Finding secondary sources:

    Slide 5 - Finding secondary sources:

    • Using the cases or statutes to find secondary sources:
    • Topic Summaries
    • Shepard’s
    • Using headnotes
    • 5
    • Step #2 – Find a Secondary Source (cont.)
  6. Slide 6

    • 6
  7. Lexis Advance Tools:

    Slide 7 - Lexis Advance Tools:

    • Headnotes
    • Links above headnotes
    • Topic Summaries
    • Briefs
    • Selected Text
    • Legal Issue Trail
    • Shepard’s
    • 7
    • Step #3 –Using the Tools within Your Case
  8. Slide 8

    • 8
    • Step #3 – Using the Tools within in Your Case (cont.)
  9. Searching Strategies

    Slide 9 - Searching Strategies

    • Use the TRAC system:
    • Terms
    • Root Expander
    • Alternative Terms
    • Connect
    • 9
    • Step #4 – Searching
  10. Slide 10

    • 10
    • Step #4 – Searching (cont.)
  11. Shepardize!!!!

    Slide 11 - Shepardize!!!!

    • Why?
    • Cite good law
    • Find additional authority
    • Analyze your cases
    • Locate secondary sources
    • 11
    • Step #5 – Shepard’s
  12. Slide 12

    • 12
    • Step #5 – Shepard’s (cont.)
  13. Step #1 – Use the record to get started

    Slide 13 - Step #1 – Use the record to get started

    • Step #2 – Finding Secondary Sources
    • Step #3 – Treat your documents like sponge and squeeze them out using all of the tools at your disposal
    • Step #4 – Use the TRAC method to search more effectively
    • Step #5 – Shepardize to validate cases/statutes, find additional authority and comprehensively research the cases at issue
    • 13
    • Recap
  14. Art of Advocacy – excellent secondary source that includes practical advice on persuasive writing and oral argument

    Slide 14 - Art of Advocacy – excellent secondary source that includes practical advice on persuasive writing and oral argument

    • Moore’s on Federal Practice – most cited secondary source on federal practice
    • “Ted Talk” by Amy Cuddy (power poses) – build confidence
    • 14
    • Bonus Tips
  15. What is the tool within Shepard’s that allows you to analyze your case by looking at the cases cited by your case?

    Slide 15 - What is the tool within Shepard’s that allows you to analyze your case by looking at the cases cited by your case?

    • Name 3 Lexis Advance tools that you can use to build off of an existing case.
    • True or False. Shepard’s will include any secondary sources on Lexis that have cited to your case.
    • Which United States Supreme Court Justice once said briefs should be written like the television series “24”?
    • 15
    • Quiz for 400 Lexis Rewards Points!