NCCER Elc L1/M8 MIX

1.0x

NCCER Elc L1/M8 MIX

Created 3 years ago

Duration 0:00:00
lesson view count 774
Select the file type you wish to download
Slide Content
  1. Objectives

    Slide 2 - Objectives

    • When trainees have completed this session, they should be able to do the following:
    • 1. Identify and select various types and sizes of raceways and fittings for a given application.
    • 2. Identify various methods used to fabricate (join) and install raceway systems.
    • 3. Identify uses permitted for selected raceways.
    • 4. Demonstrate how to install a flexible raceway system.
    • 5. Terminate a selected raceway system.
    • 6. Identify the appropriate conduit body for a given application.
    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
  2. Performance Tasks

    Slide 3 - Performance Tasks

    • 1. Identify and select various types and sizes of raceways, fittings, and fasteners for a given application.
    • 2. Demonstrate how to install a flexible raceway system.
    • 3. Terminate a selected raceway system.
    • 4. Identify the appropriate conduit body for a given application.
    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
  3. 1.0.0 – 3.2.1

    Slide 4 - 1.0.0 – 3.2.1

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Introduction; Raceways; Conduit
    • • A raceway is an electrical channel or conduit used to house electrical wiring. Raceway must be installed, grounded, and bonded per the NEC®.
    • • Metal conduit is a circular raceway that can be used as a path to ground.
    • • EMT, RMC, and IMC can all be used as conduit.
  4. 1.0.0 – 3.2.1

    Slide 5 - 1.0.0 – 3.2.1

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Compression Fittings
    • • EMT is too thin for threading and requires the use of setscrew or compression fittings.
    • • Fittings must be matched to the application.
  5. 1.0.0 – 3.2.1

    Slide 6 - 1.0.0 – 3.2.1

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Setscrew Fittings
    • • Compression fittings are used in wet locations.
    • • Setscrew fittings are used in dry locations.
  6. 3.0.0

    Slide 7 - 3.0.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • EMT
    • RMC
    • PVC
    • FMC
    • LFMC
    • Electrical Mechanical
    • Tubing
    • Rigid Metal
    • Conduit
    • Rigid Polyvinyl
    • Chloride Conduit
    • Liquid Tight Flexible
    • Metal Conduit
    • Flexible
    • Metal
    • Conduit
    • (aka FLEX)
  7. 3.2.2 – 3.2.6

    Slide 8 - 3.2.2 – 3.2.6

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Rigid Metal Conduit
    • • RMC requires the use of threaded fittings and is available in steel or aluminum. Plastic-coated RMC provides corrosion protection.
    • • IMC has a thinner wall than RMC and is lighter and less expensive, but its use is restricted in some jurisdictions. Check local codes.
  8. 3.2.2

    Slide 9 - 3.2.2

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Although NEC 344.30(B)(1) says that RMC supports should not be placed more than 10’ apart, (B)(2) says that as long as everything is threaded and that the supports prevent stresses, then Table 344.30 (B)(2) can be used.
  9. 3.2.4

    Slide 10 - 3.2.4

    • Aluminum Conduit has a better tolerance water and chemicals. Because of this, Aluminum Conduit is used in sewage treatment plants and even wineries.
    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
  10. 3.2.7 – 3.2.8

    Slide 11 - 3.2.7 – 3.2.8

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Rigid Polyvinyl Chloride Conduit
    • • PVC does not corrode and is easier to handle than metal conduit, but is subject to expansion/contraction due to temperature changes and cannot be used as an equipment grounding conductor. It is also great in wet and corrosive environments because it is chemically inert.
    • • PVC is available in two types: Type 1 or EB (thin wall), and Type 2 or DB (thick wall). Schedule 40 DB is heavy duty and Schedule 80 DB is extra heavy duty.
  11. 3.2.9

    Slide 12 - 3.2.9

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • PVC Expansion Coupling
    • • Expansion couplings must be installed per the NEC® to prevent damage due to temperature changes.
    • • PVC must be supported within 3' of terminations and then every 3' to 8', depending on the size of the conduit.
    • • HDPE is rigid nonmetallic conduit listed for underground use.
  12. 3.2.8

    Slide 13 - 3.2.8

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • NEC Article 353: HDPE is suitable for direct burial or where it is encased in concrete.
    • It is usually has cables pre-installed in the HDPE conduit.
  13. HDPE Conduit Installation

    Slide 14 - HDPE Conduit Installation

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
  14. 3.2.9

    Slide 15 - 3.2.9

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Liquidtight Flexible Nonmetallic Conduit
    • • Liquidtight flexible nonmetallic conduit (LFNC) is sunlight resistant and available in several types for use in wet locations.
    • • Compression connectors are used with LFNC.
  15. 3.2.10

    Slide 16 - 3.2.10

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Flexible Metal Conduit
    • • Flexible nonmetallic conduit (flex) is often used in applications subject to vibration, such as in motor connections.
    • • A flexible conduit connector is used to make a flex-to-box connection.
  16. 3.2.10

    Slide 17 - 3.2.10

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Combination Couplings
    • • Combination couplings can be used to connect flex to EMT or RMC.
    • • Flexible metal conduit is available in both liquidtight and nonliquidtight types.
    • • Flex must be supported within 12" of each connection and every 4½' thereafter.
    • Next Sessions…
    • Metal Conduit Fittings
  17. 4.0.0 – 4.1.0

    Slide 18 - 4.0.0 – 4.1.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Metal Conduit Fittings
    • • The type of fitting selected depends on the type of conduit, its location, and the installation method.
    • • Couplings are fittings that are threaded inside to join two pieces of conduit.
  18. 4.0.0 – 4.1.0

    Slide 19 - 4.0.0 – 4.1.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Metal Conduit Couplings
    • Couplings are available in various types for different types of conduit and applications.
  19. 4.2.0

    Slide 20 - 4.2.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Conduit Bodies
    • • Conduit bodies, also called condulets, can be used at junctions or pull points. They are more expensive than couplings, but may be required in exposed or outdoor locations or to change the type or size of raceway.
    • • The maximum number of conductors permitted in a conduit body is found using NEC Table 314.16(B).
  20. 4.2.1

    Slide 21 - 4.2.1

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Type C Conduit Bodies
    • • A Type C conduit body is a straight fitting with a screw-on cover for conductor access.
    • • Type C conduit bodies are used to provide a pull point in a long run or one with bends totaling more than 360°.
  21. 4.2.2

    Slide 22 - 4.2.2

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Type L Conduit Bodies
    • • A Type L conduit body is an elbow fitting that provides a 90° change in direction.
    • • Various types of Type L conduit bodies are available to provide access to the conductors from the top, either side, or both sides.
  22. 4.2.3

    Slide 23 - 4.2.3

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Type T Conduit Bodies
    • Type T conduit bodies provide a junction point between three intersecting conduits.
  23. 4.2.4

    Slide 24 - 4.2.4

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Type X Conduit Bodies
    • Type X conduit bodies provide a junction point for four intersecting conduits.
  24. 4.2.5

    Slide 25 - 4.2.5

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Threaded Weatherproof Hub
    • Threaded waterproof hubs are used for conduit entering a box in a wet location.
  25. 4.3.0 – 4.3.1

    Slide 26 - 4.3.0 – 4.3.1

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Insulating Bushings
    • Insulating bushings are used to protect conductors from being damaged by threaded conduit entering a sheet metal enclosure.
  26. 4.3.2

    Slide 27 - 4.3.2

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Grounding Insulating Bushings
    • Grounded insulating bushings both protect conductors and allow for the connection of an equipment grounding conductor.
  27. 4.4.0

    Slide 28 - 4.4.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Offset Nipples
    • Offset nipples are used to make quick offset connections between two pieces of equipment in close proximity.
    • Performance Task
    • Have the trainees identify the appropriate conduit body for a given application.
  28. 5.0.0

    Slide 29 - 5.0.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Making a Conduit-to-Box Connection
    • Locknuts are used on the inside and outside walls between a box and a conduit connection. A grounding locknut is used for the connection of a bonding wire.
  29. 6.0.0

    Slide 30 - 6.0.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Conduit-to-Box Connections
    • • A good conduit-to-box connection requires the use of both internal and external locknuts and a protective bushing.
    • • An offset or kick may be required so that the conduit enters straight into the box.
    • Performance Task
    • This session will conclude with trainees terminating a selected raceway system.
    • Next Session…
    • Sealing Fittings
  30. 6.0.0

    Slide 31 - 6.0.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Sealing Fittings
    • • A variety of sealing fittings are used in hazardous location to minimize the passage of dangerous gases and vapors through the conduit system.
    • • Sealing fittings are also used to make connections between hazardous (classified) and nonhazardous (unclassified) locations.
  31. 7.0.0 – 7.1.0

    Slide 32 - 7.0.0 – 7.1.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Fasteners and Anchors
    • • Many types of fasteners are used to attach conduit to a building structure. The type of fastener selected depends on whether the conduit is connected to wood, concrete, or metal.
    • • Tie wraps are used to bundle and identify cable.
  32. 7.2.0 – 7.2.1

    Slide 33 - 7.2.0 – 7.2.1

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Screws
    • • Screws are made in a variety of sizes, shapes, and head types. Always use a screwdriver or power driver with the proper tip to match the screw being driven.
    • • Wood screws are used to fasten electrical boxes or panels to wooden framing members. Choose a screw long enough so that at least two-thirds of the screw length will enter the wooden member.
  33. 7.2.2

    Slide 34 - 7.2.2

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Lag Screws and Shields
    • • Lag screws and shields are used in applications that require greater holding power.
    • • The length of the lag screw should equal the thickness of the component to be fastened plus the length of the lag shield.
  34. 7.2.3

    Slide 35 - 7.2.3

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Concrete/Masonry Screws
    • Concrete/masonry screws are driven into predrilled holes in concrete using a rotary hammer fitted with a carbide drill bit.
  35. 7.2.4

    Slide 36 - 7.2.4

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Thread-Forming and Thread-Cutting Screws
    • Thread-forming screws eliminate the need to tap a hole before installing the screw. They must be installed per the manufacturer’s instructions.
  36. 7.2.4

    Slide 37 - 7.2.4

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Thread-Cutting Screws
    • Thread-cutting screws can be used to join metal components that are softer than the hardened steel of the screw.
  37. 7.2.4

    Slide 38 - 7.2.4

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Can you name an electrical application for self-drilling screws?
  38. 7.2.5

    Slide 39 - 7.2.5

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Drywall Screws
    • • Drywall screws are used to hold wallboard tight to a stud.
    • • They have a bugle-shaped head with a Phillips or Robertson shape to prevent damage to the wall surface during installation.
  39. 7.2.6

    Slide 40 - 7.2.6

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Drive Screws
    • • Drive screws are installed by hammering the screw into a drilled or punched hole of the proper size.
    • • Drive screws are commonly used on motor nameplates.
  40. 7.3.0

    Slide 41 - 7.3.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Hammer-Driven Pins and Studs
    • • Hammer-driven pins or threaded studs are used to fasten wood or steel to concrete without the need to predrill holes.
    • • The pin is inserted in the tool, positioned against the surface to be fastened, and struck using an engineer’s hammer.
  41. 7.4.0

    Slide 42 - 7.4.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Powder-Actuated Tools and Fasteners
    • • Powder-actuated fasteners use a gunpowder charge to drive fasteners into masonry or steel.
    • • The use of a powder-actuated tool requires special training and an operator’s license.
  42. 7.5.0 – 7.5.1

    Slide 43 - 7.5.0 – 7.5.1

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Mechanical Anchors
    • • Mechanical anchors provide additional holding power in applications that would not hold with a standard fastener.
    • • Common anchor types include one-step anchors, bolt anchors, screw anchors, self-drilling anchors, and hollow-wall anchors.
    • • One-step anchors are installed in a single operation.
  43. 7.5.2

    Slide 44 - 7.5.2

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Bolt Anchors
    • • Bolt anchors are used in conjunction with threaded machine bolts or screws.
    • • Two common types of bolt anchors are drop-in and expansion anchors. Double expansion anchors provide additional holding power when the strength of the concrete or masonry is in question.
  44. 7.5.3

    Slide 45 - 7.5.3

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Screw Anchors
    • • Screw anchors are used with sheet metal, wood, or lag screws.
    • • Common screw anchors are made of fiberglass or plastic. The anchor must be matched to the size and type of screw.
  45. 7.5.4

    Slide 46 - 7.5.4

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Self-Drilling Anchors
    • • Self-drilling anchors are used in concrete.
    • • The cutting sleeve is used as a drill bit and then driven back in the hole to become part of the fastener.
  46. 7.6.0

    Slide 47 - 7.6.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Guidelines for Drilling Anchor Holes in Hardened Concrete or Masonry
    • • When drilling anchor holes in concrete or masonry, drill the bolt hole the same size as the fastener.
    • • Drive the anchor bolt into the hole using a hammer.
    • • Add a washer and nut and tighten with a wrench until it is secure.
  47. 7.7.0 – 7.7.4

    Slide 48 - 7.7.0 – 7.7.4

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Hollow-Wall Anchors
    • • Hollow-wall anchors are used in hollow materials such as wallboard, plaster, block, and structural steel.
    • • Toggle bolts are used in a predrilled hole and then tightened to draw the wings of the fastener against the back of the surface.
  48. 7.7.0 – 7.7.4

    Slide 49 - 7.7.0 – 7.7.4

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Sleeve-Type, Wallboard, and Metal Drive-In Anchors
    • • Other types of anchors include sleeve-type, wallboard, and metal drive-in anchors.
    • • Sleeve-type anchors are either tapped into a predrilled hole or driven in with a hammer. Wallboard anchors are self-drilling, while metal drive-in anchors are hammered into place.
  49. 7.7.0 – 7.7.4

    Slide 50 - 7.7.0 – 7.7.4

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Sleeve-Type Drive Anchors
    • What happens when you remove the screw
    • when a sleeve-type drive anchor is in place?
  50. 7.7.0 – 7.7.4

    Slide 51 - 7.7.0 – 7.7.4

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Ceiling Installations
    • In the dormitory question discussed earlier, which of these fasteners could have been used to safely secure the emergency lights?
  51. 7.7.0 – 7.7.4

    Slide 52 - 7.7.0 – 7.7.4

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Epoxy Anchoring Systems
    • • Epoxy anchoring systems use a two-part epoxy that is installed using a tool similar to a caulking gun.
    • • To use these anchors, a hole is predrilled and cleaned, then the hole is filled halfway with epoxy. The fastener is then inserted and allowed to harden before tightening.
  52. 8.0.0 – 8.1.0

    Slide 53 - 8.0.0 – 8.1.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Raceway Supports
    • • Raceway supports must be installed properly into sound structural members.
    • • Straps are often used to support conduit against a surface.
  53. 8.2.0

    Slide 54 - 8.2.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Standoff Supports
    • Standoff supports are used to support conduit away from the structure.
  54. 8.3.0

    Slide 55 - 8.3.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Electrical Framing Channels
    • • Electrical framing channels are used with conduit clamps to support conduit from a ceiling, wall, or other surface.
    • • Trapeze hangers are used with framing channels to support overhead conduit.
  55. 8.4.0

    Slide 56 - 8.4.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Beam Clamps
    • Beam clamps are used with suspended hangers. One end is attached to the beam and the other to a hanger.
    •  Performance Task
    • This session will conclude with trainees identifying and selecting various types and sizes of raceways, fittings, and fasteners for a given application.
    • Next Session…
    • Wireways
  56. 9.0.0 – 9.1.0

    Slide 57 - 9.0.0 – 9.1.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Wireways
    • • Wireways are sheet metal troughs with removable covers for access to the conductors.
    • • Auxiliary gutters are similar to wireways, but are part of larger assemblies such as switchboards or distribution equipment.
  57. 9.2.0 – 9.2.1

    Slide 58 - 9.2.0 – 9.2.1

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Types of Wireways
    • • Duct-type wireways are available with hinged covers to lay in the conductors or as a screw-cover trough.
    • • Troughs provide access from the side rather than the top. Raintight troughs are used where exposed to moisture.
  58. 9.2.0 – 9.2.1

    Slide 59 - 9.2.0 – 9.2.1

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Trough
    • Troughs contain knockouts similar to junction boxes.
  59. 9.2.0 – 9.2.1

    Slide 60 - 9.2.0 – 9.2.1

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Wireway Sections
    • • A variety of fittings are available to create wireway systems.
    • • The fittings are attached to the duct using slip-on connectors.
  60. 9.2.2

    Slide 61 - 9.2.2

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Connectors
    • Connectors are held to the wireway section using small bolts and nuts. A friction hinge holds the wireway cover open for access.
  61. 9.2.3

    Slide 62 - 9.2.3

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • End Plates
    • • Wireways are finished using end plates.
    • • Knockouts allow the conductors to extend beyond the end plate.
  62. 9.2.4

    Slide 63 - 9.2.4

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Tees
    • Tee connections are used where conductors must branch in different directions. The sides are removable for access to splices and taps.
  63. 9.2.5

    Slide 64 - 9.2.5

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Crosses
    • Crosses are used to provide an intersection with four openings.
  64. 9.2.6 – 9.2.7

    Slide 65 - 9.2.6 – 9.2.7

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Elbows
    • • Elbows are available in angles of 22½°, 45°, and 90°. The inside corners are rounded to prevent conductor damage.
    • • Telescopic (slip) fittings are used to attach wireway sections and are similar to a conduit nipple.
  65. 9.3.0 – 9.3.1

    Slide 66 - 9.3.0 – 9.3.1

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Wireway Supports
    • • Horizontal wireways must be supported at each end and every 5' thereafter.
    • • Wireways should be direct-mounted whenever possible; otherwise, suspended hangers may be used.
  66. 9.3.2

    Slide 67 - 9.3.2

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Gusset Brackets
    • Gusset brackets are used for wall mounting of wireways. The wireway rests on the bracket and is attached using screws or bolts.
  67. 9.3.3

    Slide 68 - 9.3.3

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Standard Hangers
    • Standard hangers are made in two pieces that can be combined in different ways for different installation requirements.
  68. 9.3.4

    Slide 69 - 9.3.4

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Wireway Hangers
    • • Wireway hangers are used to support larger wireways.
    • • A wireway hanger consists of a piece of strut mounted on threaded rods attached to a ceiling, beam, or other structural member.
  69. 9.4.0 – 9.4.1

    Slide 70 - 9.4.0 – 9.4.1

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Other Types of Raceways
    • • Surface metal and nonmetallic raceways are used indoors in dry locations.
    • • Smaller raceways are used to extend power conductors from one point to another.
  70. 9.4.0 – 9.4.1

    Slide 71 - 9.4.0 – 9.4.1

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Pancake Raceway
    • Pancake raceways have a low profile and are used to extend power, lighting, telephone, or signal wire across the surface of a floor.
  71. 9.4.0 – 9.4.1

    Slide 72 - 9.4.0 – 9.4.1

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Examples of Surface Raceway
    • Twinduct or triple-duct raceways include partitions to separate power and control wiring.
  72. 9.4.2

    Slide 73 - 9.4.2

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Multi-Outlet Assemblies
    • Multi-outlet assemblies hold receptacles and other devices within the raceway.
  73. 9.4.3

    Slide 74 - 9.4.3

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Pole Systems
    • Power poles are used to provide power in office cubicles and similar locations.
  74. 9.4.4

    Slide 75 - 9.4.4

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Underfloor Systems
    • • Underfloor raceways are used to provide lighting, power, and signal wiring to cabinets and consoles.
    • • The inserts can be removed for outlet installation where desired.
  75. 9.4.5 – 9.4.6

    Slide 76 - 9.4.5 – 9.4.6

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Cellular Metal Floor Raceways; Cellular Concrete Floor Raceways
    • • Cellular metal raceways can be used to route wiring in steel-frame buildings.
    • • Junction boxes are installed in cellular concrete floor raceways to provide access to the conductors.
  76. 10.0.0 – 10.1.0

    Slide 77 - 10.0.0 – 10.1.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Cable Trays
    • • Cable trays provide open access in applications with frequent cable changes.
    • • A variety of fittings are available to provide changes in tray direction and/or dimension.
  77. 10.2.0 – 10.2.1

    Slide 78 - 10.2.0 – 10.2.1

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Cable Tray Supports
    • • Cable trays are typically supported in one of five ways: direct rod suspension, trapeze mounting, center hung, wall mounting, and pipe rack mounting.
    • • Direct rod suspension uses threaded rod and hanger clamps.
  78. 10.2.2

    Slide 79 - 10.2.2

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Trapeze Mounting and Center Hung Support
    • • Trapeze mounting is similar to direct rod suspension but uses a steel channel or strut similar to a trapeze.
    • • A center-hung cable tray uses a center rod and allows the cable to be easily dropped in or pulled out.
  79. 10.2.3 – 12.0.0

    Slide 80 - 10.2.3 – 12.0.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Wall Mounting; Pipe Rack Mounting; Storing Raceways; Handling Raceways
    • • Wall mounting uses structural supports mounted directly to the wall. It is typically found in tunnels and other underground locations with long cable runs between components.
    • • Pipe racks are often used to connect equipment outdoors in industrial facilities.
    • • Raceway components must be stored and handled carefully to prevent damage.
  80. 13.0.0 – 13.4.0

    Slide 81 - 13.0.0 – 13.4.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Ducting
    • Duct banks are used to safely route power underground rather than overhead.
  81. 13.0.0 – 13.4.0

    Slide 82 - 13.0.0 – 13.4.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Manhole
    • • Manholes are set at intervals to provide access to underground duct runs. They are often located at intersections to provide access to cables in four directions.
    • • Underground duct lines can be made of fiber, tile, rigid metal or nonmetallic conduit, or poured concrete.
    • • Monolithic concrete is poured at the job site.
    • • Cable-in-duct is supplied with the conductors preinstalled.
    • Next Sessions…
    • Construction Methods
  82. 14.0.0 – 14.1.0

    Slide 83 - 14.0.0 – 14.1.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Construction Methods
    • • Raceway installation methods vary by the type of construction.
    • • Concrete boxes are nailed to wooden forms for embedding in the concrete when it is poured.
  83. 14.0.0 – 14.1.0

    Slide 84 - 14.0.0 – 14.1.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Box with Raised Ring
    • • When installing boxes flush in masonry construction, the electrician should work closely with the mason laying the blocks. The boxes are made up when the blocks reach the outlet elevation.
    • • Smaller boxes may require extension rings to bring them flush with the masonry surface.
  84. 14.2.0

    Slide 85 - 14.2.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Three-Gang Concrete Box
    • Larger boxes do not require extension rings to bring them flush with the masonry surface.
  85. 14.2.0

    Slide 86 - 14.2.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Metal Stud Environment
    • • Wiring in a metal stud environment is easier than wiring in concrete or masonry.
    • • Metal studs often include pre-punched holes for routing conductors. If not, a hole can be easily punched in the desired location.
  86. 14.2.0

    Slide 87 - 14.2.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • NM Cable Protected by Grommets
    • NM cable must be protect using listed bushings or grommets.
  87. 14.3.0

    Slide 88 - 14.3.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Wood Frame Environment
    • EMT can be run through wooden members using either notching or boring. Boring is the preferred method.
  88. 14.3.0

    Slide 89 - 14.3.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Steel Nail Plate
    • • A nail plate is required to protect the conductors where the wiring is installed less than 1¼" from the nearest edge.
    • • Nail plates are also required to protect the conductors in all wooden members.
  89. 14.4.0

    Slide 90 - 14.4.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Metal Buildings
    • • Conduit can be routed across the structural members that support the roof in metal building construction so long as it is no less than 1½" away from the roof decking.
    • • The roof structure of a metal building can consist of either beams and purlins or open-web steel joists.
  90. 14.4.0

    Slide 91 - 14.4.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Beam and Purlin Roof System
    • • Beams and purlins should not be drilled. Instead, the conduit is supported from the metal beams using special anchoring devices.
    • • All conduit is run exposed and must be plumb, level, and neat.
  91. 14.4.0

    Slide 92 - 14.4.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Open-Web Steel Joist Roof Supports
  92. 14.4.0

    Slide 93 - 14.4.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • Steel Strut System
    • Rigid metal conduit is often required in steel building construction.
    • Performance Task
    • This session will conclude with trainees installing a flexible raceway system.
  93. 14.4.0

    Slide 94 - 14.4.0

    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
    • What’s wrong with this picture?
  94. Wrap Up

    Slide 95 - Wrap Up

    • 3-2-1
    • 3 – Write 3 important things learned during class
    • 2 – Write 2 questions you have about the material
    • 1 – Write 1 thought you had about the material
    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14
  95. Next Session…

    Slide 96 - Next Session…

    • MODULE EXAM
    • Review the complete module to prepare for the module exam. Complete the Module Review as a study aid.
    • Raceways and Fittings 26108-14