Session 7 Gospels audio

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Session 7 Gospels audio

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  1. 2015 Spring Study

    Slide 1 - 2015 Spring Study

    • “Preparing For The Future”
    • Session 7:
    • Survey of The New Testament
  2. Tonight’s Session

    Slide 2 - Tonight’s Session

    • Review Session 6
    • The Poetry of the Old Testament
    • Job
    • Psalms
    • Proverbs
    • Ecclesiastes
  3. The New Testament

    Slide 4 - The New Testament

    • The Gospels
  4. THE GOSPELS

    Slide 5 - THE GOSPELS

    • The gospels are the record of the birth, life, ministry, and death of Jesus Christ. They record Jesus teaching about the Kingdom and how its subjects should live. One of the main features of these books is the parables of Jesus.
    • 4 Books included:
    • Matthew, Mark, Luke (called synoptic because they are alike)
    • John (put in a class by itself because its emphasis is different)
    • MATTHEW
  5. — The author of this book was beyond a doubt the Matthew, an apostle of our Lord, whose name it bears. He wrote the Gospel of Christ according to his own plans and aims, and from his own point of view, as did also the other "evangelists.“

    Slide 6 - — The author of this book was beyond a doubt the Matthew, an apostle of our Lord, whose name it bears. He wrote the Gospel of Christ according to his own plans and aims, and from his own point of view, as did also the other "evangelists.“

    • As to the time of its composition, there is little in the Gospel itself to indicate. It was evidently written before the destruction of Jerusalem (Matt 24), and some time after the events it records. The probability is that it was written between the years A.D. 60 and 65.
    • The cast of thought and the forms of expression employed by the writer show that this Gospel was written for Jewish Christians of Palestine. His great object is to prove that Jesus of Nazareth was the promised Messiah, and that in him the ancient prophecies had their fulfilment.
  6. MATTHEW

    Slide 7 - MATTHEW

    • The Gospel is full of allusions to those passages of the Old Testament in which Christ is predicted and foreshadowed. The one aim pervading the whole book is to show that Jesus is he "of whom Moses in the law and the prophets did write." This Gospel contains no fewer than sixty-five references to the Old Testament, forty-three of these being direct verbal citations, thus greatly outnumbering those found in the other Gospels. The main feature of this Gospel may be expressed in the motto, "I am not come to destroy, but to fulfil.“
    • ILLUSTRATED BIBLE DICTIONARY By M. G. EASTON Third Edition Published by Harper & Brothers, 1903
  7. Slide 8

    • Part One: The Presentation of the King (1:1—4:11)
    • I. The Advent ot the King 1:1—2:23
    • II. The Announcer of the King 3:1-12
    • III. The Approval of the King 3:13—4:11
    • Part Two: The Proclamation of the King (4:12—7:29)
    • I. The Background for the Sermon 4:12-25
    • II. The Sermon on the Mount 5:1—7:29
    • Part Three: The Power of the King (8:1—11:1)
    • I. The Demonstration of the King's Power 8:1—9:34
    • II. The Delegation of the King's Power 9:35—11:1
  8. Slide 9

    • Part Four: The Progressive Rejection of the King (11:2—16:12)
    • I. The Beginning of Rejection 11:2-30
    • II. The Rejection of Christ by the Pharisees 12
    • III. The Consequences of the Rejection 13:1-53
    • IV. The Continuing Rejection of the King 13:54—16:12
    • Part Five: The Preparation of the King's Disciples (16:13—20:28)
    • I. Revelation of Great Truths 16:13—17:13
    • II. The Instruction in View of Rejection 17:14—20:28
  9. Slide 10

    • Part Six: The Presentation and Rejection of the King (20:29—27:66)
    • I. The Blind Men Recognize the King 20:29-34
    • II. The Public Presentation of the King 21:1-17
    • III. The Nation Respects the King 21:18—22:46
    • IV. The King Rejects the Nation 23
    • V. The Predictions of the King's Second Coming 24:1—25:46VI. The Passion of the King 26:1—27:66
    • Part Seven: The Proof of the King (28:1-20)
    • I. The Empty Tomb 28:1-8
    • II. The Appearance of Jesus to the Women 28:9-10
    • III. The Bribery of the Soldiers 28:11-15
    • IV. The Appearance of Jesus to the Disciples 28:16-17
    • V. The Great Commission 28:18-20
  10. THE GOSPELS

    Slide 11 - THE GOSPELS

    • The gospels are the record of the birth, life, ministry, and death of Jesus Christ. They record Jesus teaching about the Kingdom and how its subjects should live. One of the main features of these books is the parables of Jesus.
    • 4 Books included:
    • Matthew, Mark, Luke (called synoptic because they are alike)
    • John (put in a class by itself because its emphasis is different)
    • MARK
  11. MARK

    Slide 12 - MARK

    • — It is the current and apparently well-founded tradition that Mark derived his information mainly from the discourses of Peter. In his mother's house he would have abundant opportunities of obtaining information from the other apostles and their coadjutors, yet he was "the disciple and interpreter of Peter" specially.
    • As to the time when it was written, the Gospel furnishes us with no definite information. Mark makes no mention of the destruction of Jerusalem, hence it must have been written before that event, and probably about A.D. 63.
  12. The place where it was written was probably Rome. Some have supposed Antioch (comp. Mark 15:21 with Acts 11:20).

    Slide 13 - The place where it was written was probably Rome. Some have supposed Antioch (comp. Mark 15:21 with Acts 11:20).

    • It was intended primarily for Romans. This appears probable when it is considered that it makes no reference to the Jewish law, and that the writer takes care to interpret words which a Gentile would be likely to misunderstand, such as, "Boanerges" (3:17); "Talitha cumi" (5:41); "Corban" (7:11); "Bartimaeus" (10:46); "Abba" (14:36); "Eloi," etc. (15:34). Jewish usages are also explained (7:3; 14:3,12; 15:42).
    • Mark also uses certain Latin words not found in any of the other Gospels, as "speculator" (6:27, rendered, A.V., "executioner;" R.V., "soldier of his guard"), "xestes" (a corruption of sextarius, rendered "pots," 7:4,8), "quadrans" (12:42, rendered "a farthing"), "centurion" (15:39,44,45). He only twice quotes from the Old Testament (1:2; 15:28).
    • ILLUSTRATED BIBLE DICTIONARY By M. G. EASTON Third Edition Published by Harper & Brothers, 1903
  13. MARK: A Teaching Outline

    Slide 14 - MARK: A Teaching Outline

    • Part One: The Presentation of the Servant (1:1—2:12)
    • I. The Forerunner of the Servant 1:1-8
    • II. The Baptism of the Servant 1:9-11
    • III. The Temptation of the Servant 1:12-13
    • IV. The Mission of the Servant 1:14—2:12
    • Part Two: The Opposition to the Servant (2:13—8:26)
    • I. The Initial Opposition to the Servant 2:13—3:35
    • II. The Parables of the Servant 4:1-34
    • III. The Miracles of the Servant 4:35—5:43
    • IV. The Growing Opposition to the Servant 6:1—8:26
  14. Part Three: The Instruction by the Servant (8:27—10:52)

    Slide 15 - Part Three: The Instruction by the Servant (8:27—10:52)

    • I. Peter's Confession of Christ 8:27-33
    • II. Cost of Discipleship 8:34—9:1
    • III. The Transfiguration 9:2-13
    • IV. Demon-possessed Son Is Delivered 9:14-29
    • V. Jesus Foretells His Death 9:30-32
    • VI. Jesus Teaches to Prepare the Disciples 9:33—10:45
    • VII. Blind Bartimaeus Is Healed 10:46-52
  15. Part Four: The Rejection of the Servant (11:1—15:47)

    Slide 16 - Part Four: The Rejection of the Servant (11:1—15:47)

    • I. The Formal Presentation of the Servant 11:1-19
    • II. The Instruction on Prayer 11:20-26
    • III. The Opposition by the Leaders 11:27—12:44
    • IV. The Instruction on the Future 13
    • V. The Passion of the Servant 14:1—15:47
    • Part Five: The Resurrection of the Servant (16:1-20)
    • I. The Resurrection of Jesus 16:1-8
    • II. The Appearances of Jesus 16:9-18
    • III. The Ascension of Jesus 16:19-20
  16. THE GOSPELS

    Slide 17 - THE GOSPELS

    • The gospels are the record of the birth, life, ministry, and death of Jesus Christ. They record Jesus teaching about the Kingdom and how its subjects should live. One of the main features of these books is the parables of Jesus.
    • 4 Books included:
    • Matthew, Mark, Luke (called synoptic because they are alike)
    • John (put in a class by itself because its emphasis is different)
    • LUKE
  17. LUKE

    Slide 18 - LUKE

    • Luke — was written by Luke. He does not claim to have been an eye-witness of our Lord's ministry, but to have gone to the best sources of information within his reach, and to have written an orderly narrative of the facts (Luke 1:1-4). The authors of the first three Gospels, the synoptics, wrote independently of each other. Each wrote his independent narrative under the guidance of the Holy Spirit.
    • Each writer has some things, both in matter and style, peculiar to himself, yet all the three have much in common. Luke's Gospel has been called "the Gospel of the nations, full of mercy and hope, assured to the world by the love of a suffering Savior;" "the Gospel of the saintly life;"
  18. LUKE

    Slide 19 - LUKE

    • "the Gospel for the Greeks; the Gospel of the future; the Gospel of progressive Christianity, of the universality and gratuitousness of the gospel; the historic Gospel; the Gospel of Jesus as the good Physician and the Saviour of mankind;" the "Gospel of the Fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man;" "the Gospel of womanhood;" "the Gospel of the outcast, of the Samaritan, the publican, the harlot, and the prodigal;" "the Gospel of tolerance."
    • The main characteristic of this Gospel, as Farrar (Cambridge Bible, Luke, Introd.) remarks, is fitly expressed in the motto, "Who went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed of the devil" (Acts 10:38; comp. Luke 4:18). Luke wrote for the "Hellenic world." This Gospel is indeed "rich and precious."
  19. "Out of a total of 1151 verses, Luke has 389 in common with Matthew and Mark, 176 in common with Matthew alone, 41 in common with Mark alone, leaving 544 peculiar to himself. In many instances all three use identical language." (See MATTHEW; MARK; GOSPELS.)

    Slide 20 - "Out of a total of 1151 verses, Luke has 389 in common with Matthew and Mark, 176 in common with Matthew alone, 41 in common with Mark alone, leaving 544 peculiar to himself. In many instances all three use identical language." (See MATTHEW; MARK; GOSPELS.)

    • There are seventeen of our Lord's parables peculiar to this Gospel. (See List of Parables in Appendix.) Luke also records seven of our Lord's miracles which are omitted by Matthew and Mark.
    • ILLUSTRATED BIBLE DICTIONARY By M. G. EASTON Third Edition Published by Harper & Brothers, 1903
    • LUKE
  20. LUKE: A Teaching Outline

    Slide 21 - LUKE: A Teaching Outline

    • Part One: The Introduction of the Son of Man (1:1—4:13)
    • I. The Purpose and Method of Luke's 1:1-4Gospel
    • II. The Events Preceding Christ's Birth 1:5-56
    • III. The Events Accompanying Christ's Birth 1:57—2:38
    • IV. The Events During Christ's Childhood 2:39-52
  21. V.	The Events Preceding Christ's Presentation 		3:1—4:13Part Two: The Ministry of the Son of Man (4:14—9:50)

    Slide 22 - V. The Events Preceding Christ's Presentation 3:1—4:13Part Two: The Ministry of the Son of Man (4:14—9:50)

    • I. The Presentation of Christ 4:14-30
    • II. The Demonstration of Christ's Powers 4:31—5:28
    • III. The Explanation of Christ's Program 5:29—6:49
    • IV. The Expansion of Christ's Program 7:1—9:50
    • LUKE
  22. Part Three: The Rejection of the Son of Man (9:51—19:27)

    Slide 23 - Part Three: The Rejection of the Son of Man (9:51—19:27)

    • I. The Increasing Opposition to Christ 9:51—11:54
    • II. The Instruction in View of Christ's Rejection
    • 12:1—19:27
  23. Part Four: The Crucifixion and Resurrection of the Son of Man (19:28—24:53)

    Slide 24 - Part Four: The Crucifixion and Resurrection of the Son of Man (19:28—24:53)

    • I. The Last Week of Christ 19:28—23:56
    • II. The Victory of Christ 24
    • LUKE
  24. THE GOSPELS

    Slide 25 - THE GOSPELS

    • The gospels are the record of the birth, life, ministry, and death of Jesus Christ. They record Jesus teaching about the Kingdom and how its subjects should live. One of the main features of these books is the parables of Jesus.
    • 4 Books included:
    • Matthew, Mark, Luke (called synoptic because they are alike)
    • John (put in a class by itself because its emphasis is different)
    • JOHN
  25. — The genuineness of this Gospel, i.e., the fact that the apostle John was its author, is beyond all reasonable doubt. In recent times, from about 1820, many attempts have been made to impugn its genuineness, but without success.

    Slide 26 - — The genuineness of this Gospel, i.e., the fact that the apostle John was its author, is beyond all reasonable doubt. In recent times, from about 1820, many attempts have been made to impugn its genuineness, but without success.

    • The design of John in writing this Gospel is stated by himself (John 20:31). It was at one time supposed that he wrote for the purpose of supplying the omissions of the synoptical, i.e., of the first three, Gospels, but there is no evidence for this.
    • "There is here no history of Jesus and his teaching after the manner of the other evangelists. But there is in historical form a representation of the Christian faith in relation to the person of Christ as its central point; and in this representation there is a picture on the one hand of the antagonism of the world to the truth revealed in him, and on the other of the spiritual blessedness of the few who yield themselves to him as the Light of life" (Reuss).
  26. JOHN

    Slide 27 - JOHN

    • After the prologue (1:1-5), the historical part of the book begins with verse 6, and consists of two parts. The first part (1:6-ch. 12) contains the history of our Lord's public ministry from the time of his introduction to it by John the Baptist to its close.
    • The second part (ch. 13-21) presents our Lord in the retirement of private life and in his intercourse with his immediate followers (13-17), and gives an account of his sufferings and of his appearances to the disciples after his resurrection (18-21).
  27. Outline of Future 2014 Sessions

    Slide 28 - Outline of Future 2014 Sessions

    • OrientationInspiration of ScriptureGenesis Though DeuteronomyJoshua Through 2 ChroniclesThe Prophets
    • The Old Testament Poetry/NT surveyThe Law, Adam, AbrahamThe Passover Lamb & The Tabernacle Types and Prophecies of Christ
    • (Brazen Serpent, Jonah, High Priest,
    • Prophet, King, Birth, Death, Resur, Set Free)The Life of Christ Part 1The Life of Christ Part 2The Life of Christ Part 3The Teachings of Christ Part 1
    • The Teachings of Christ Part 2 The Gospel of ChristThe Just Shall Live By Faith
    • Examples of ConversionProcess of Conversion Part 1
    • Process of Conversion Part 2Last Will and Testament of Christ
    • “I’m A New Man” (New Creature)The Holy SpiritThe Christ, The Cross, and The Church
    • The Establishment of The Church
    • The Identity of The ChurchNew Testament Worship
    • Authority, The Pattern, and Innovation (1)
    • Authority, The Pattern, and Innovation (2)
    • Authority, The Pattern, and Innovation (3)
    • Authority, The Pattern, and Innovation (4)
    • Basis For Christian Unity
    • FellowshipSpiritual Gifts and MiraclesChurch Government
    • Church Discipline
    • Discipleship
    • Works of Flesh and Fruits of Spirit
    • The Christian Graces
    • Love & The Law of Love
    • The Devil and Temptation