NCCER Electrical L2 M8 MIX

NCCER Electrical
1.0x

NCCER Electrical L2 M8 MIX

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  1. Objectives

    Slide 2 - Objectives

    • When trainees have completed this lesson, they should be able to do the following:
    • 1. Describe how to make a good conductor termination.
    • 2. Prepare cable ends for terminations and splices and connect using lugs or connectors.
    • 3. Train cable at termination points.
    • 4. Understand the National Electrical Code® (NEC®) requirements for making cable terminations and splices.
    • 5. Demonstrate crimping techniques.
    • 6. Select the proper lug or connector for the job.
    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
  2. Performance Tasks

    Slide 3 - Performance Tasks

    • 1. Terminate conductors using selected crimp-type and mechanical-type terminals and connectors.
    • 2. Terminate conductors on a terminal strip.
    • 3. Insulate selected types of wire splices and/or install a motor connection kit.
    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
  3. 1.0.0 – 2.0.0

    Slide 4 - 1.0.0 – 2.0.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Introduction; Stripping and Cleaning Conductors
    • • A properly made splice should last as long as the wire insulation itself.
    • • The first step in making a connection is to trim and strip the conductors. When selecting stripper blades, refer to the nominal wire sizes shown here.
  4. 2.1.0

    Slide 5 - 2.1.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Stripping Small Conductors
    • • The wire strippers shown here can be used to strip wires from No. 22 through No. 10 AWG.
    • • Match the conductor size to the correct knife groove, then insert the conductor and squeeze the tool handles. The length of the stripped conductor is determined by the amount extending beyond the blades.
  5. 2.1.0

    Slide 6 - 2.1.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Wire Strippers
    • • Production-grade stripping tools can be used to strip larger wires and may have either front or side entry jaws.
    • • Strippers with front entry jaws can be used in tight spaces.
  6. 2.2.0

    Slide 7 - 2.2.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Stripping Power Cables and Large Conductors
    • • Larger conductors can be cut using ratchet-type cable cutters.
    • • The cable cutters shown here can be used to strip wire up to 1,000 kcmil.
  7. 2.2.0

    Slide 8 - 2.2.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Heavy-Duty Cable Stripper
    • Heavy-duty cable strippers can be used to strip power cables from 1/0 through 1,000 kcmil.
  8. 2.2.0

    Slide 9 - 2.2.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Types of Cable Stripping
    • • Strippers can be used to strip the end insulation or to make window cuts.
    • • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to avoid personal injury or conductor damage.
  9. 2.2.0

    Slide 10 - 2.2.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Round Cable Slitting and Ringing Tool
    • • This tool can be used to strip single- or multi-conductor cable.
    • • It can make both square (circumferential) cuts or lengthwise (longitudinal) cuts.
  10. 2.3.0

    Slide 11 - 2.3.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Stripping Control and Signal Cable/Conductors
    • • Scissors-type tools are preferred to those that leave a flattened chisel edge on the conductors. A chisel edge can make it difficult to insert the conductor into the connector.
    • • Keep all tools sharp for best performance.
  11. 2.3.0

    Slide 12 - 2.3.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Cable and Wire Stripping Tools
    • • When stripping conductors, remove the cable jacket using an adjustable blade or a die designed for the given wire size.
    • • The terminal manufacturer will recommend the correct stripping length.
  12. 2.3.0

    Slide 13 - 2.3.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Proper Stripping Length
  13. 3.0.0 – 3.1.0

    Slide 14 - 3.0.0 – 3.1.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Wire Connections Under 600 Volts
    • • Crimp-on wire lugs are available in various sizes to accommodate wire sizes No. 22 AWG and larger. They are normally color coded for ease of identification.
    • • A variety of mechanical compression connectors are also available. These include various screw-on lugs and split-bolt connectors.
  14. 3.0.0 – 3.1.0

    Slide 15 - 3.0.0 – 3.1.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Various Mechanical Compression Connectors
  15. 3.2.0

    Slide 16 - 3.2.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Heat-Shrink Insulators
    • • Heat-shrink insulators slip over wires, terminals, and splices and are made skintight through the use of a heat gun.
    • • They are available in a wide variety of sizes and materials for different applications, and provide the advantage of quickly conforming to the contours of the insulated object.
  16. 3.2.0

    Slide 17 - 3.2.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Tubing Selector Guide
    • • Tubing is designed for specific temperature applications, as well as various tensile and dielectric strengths.
    • • It can be clear or color coded, depending on the material and its intended use.
    • Next Session…
    • Control and Signal Cable
  17. 4.0.0 – 4.2.0

    Slide 18 - 4.0.0 – 4.2.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Control and Signal Cable
    • • Electricians are typically responsible for installing control and signal cables.
    • • Fire alarm and instrumentation cables typically contain a drain (ground) wire that must be effectively grounded. Refer to the drawings for the system to be installed.
  18. 5.0.0 – 5.1.0

    Slide 19 - 5.0.0 – 5.1.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Low-Voltage Connectors and Terminals
    • • A basic crimp connector consists of a crimp barrel in which the conductor is inserted and a copper stud end with a bolt/screw opening.
    • • Most crimp connectors are color coded by size and insulated on the barrel end to prevent shorting to adjacent terminals.
  19. 5.0.0 – 5.1.0

    Slide 20 - 5.0.0 – 5.1.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Standard Tongue Styles of Crimped Connectors
    • • Crimp connectors are available in a variety of tongue styles.
    • • The most common styles are the ring tongue and the flanged or locking fork.
  20. 5.2.0

    Slide 21 - 5.2.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Color Codes
    • • Color codes may vary by manufacturer, but certain color standards have become common.
    • • Typical crimp connector color codes are shown here.
  21. 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    Slide 22 - 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Guidelines for Installing Connectors
    • • Review the project drawings and specifications before making any line connections.
    • • Always use the correct tool for the connector and the wire size. Failure to do so can result in damaged conductors and poorly made connections.
  22. 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    Slide 23 - 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Hand Crimpers
    • Pliers-type hand crimpers are used with smaller wires or when only a few connections are required.
  23. 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    Slide 24 - 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Leveraged Crimping Tool
    • • A leveraged tool provides a mechanical advantage through the use of a ratchet control.
    • • This type of tool multiplies the crimping force for a better connection and has interchangeable dies for use with various terminal sizes.
  24. 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    Slide 25 - 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Crimping Tools Used to Crimp Large Connectors
    • • The tools used to crimp large connectors supply crimping forces of about 12 tons of compression at 10,000 pounds per square inch (psi).
    • • These tools are available in hand-operated, hydraulic, battery-operated, and corded types.
  25. 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    Slide 26 - 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Battery-Operated Crimping Tool
  26. 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    Slide 27 - 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Corded Crimping Tool
  27. 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    Slide 28 - 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Universal Crimping Tool
    • Universal crimping tools offer an advantage in that they can fit a variety of terminations without the need for separate dies.
  28. 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    Slide 29 - 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Multiple Crimps
    • • Multiple crimps may be required to ensure a tight and solid connection.
    • • If multiple crimps are specified, crimp from the lug back to the barrel base, rotating the crimper as necessary to avoid deforming the barrel.
  29. 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    Slide 30 - 6.0.0 – 6.2.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Recommended Tightening Torques for Various Bolt Sizes
    • • After the conductor has been crimped in the connector, the connector must be bolted to the required torque to ensure a good electrical connection at the termination.
    • • Common torque values are shown here.
    • Performance Task
    • Trainees practice terminating conductors using selected crimp-type and mechanical-type terminals and connectors.
  30. 6.3.0

    Slide 31 - 6.3.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Installing Specialized Cable Connectors
    • • A variety of specialized connectors are used with specific applications and cable types.
    • • This weatherproof connector is used with metal-clad (Type MC) cable.
    • • The specific connector is determined by the type and size of cable and the application.
  31. 6.4.0 – 6.4.4

    Slide 32 - 6.4.0 – 6.4.4

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Installing Control and Signal Cables/Conductors
    • • Before making a crimped connection, organize, dress, and label the conductors/cables.
    • • Check the size and type of wire, and make sure the conductor and connector materials are compatible.
    • • Select the correct tool and die for the terminal and conductor, and make sure they are in good operating condition.
  32. 6.4.0 – 6.4.4

    Slide 33 - 6.4.0 – 6.4.4

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Indent Position
    • • The correct indent position is essential to ensuring a good electrical connection. Inspect all terminations prior to making any connections.
    • • An indent on the side can split the terminal seam, while an indent on the bottom may produce a loose connection.
  33. 6.4.0 – 6.4.4

    Slide 34 - 6.4.0 – 6.4.4

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Crimp Centering
    • • The conductor must be properly centered in the crimp indent.
    • • A crimp over the belled mouth will compress the insulation and result in poor or no continuity.
    • • A crimp over the inspection hole reduces both continuity and holding capacity.
  34. 6.4.0 – 6.4.4

    Slide 35 - 6.4.0 – 6.4.4

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Conductor Positioning
    • • If the stripped end of the conductor is too short, it cannot be checked in the inspection hole and may represent a loose connection.
    • • Conductors that extend too far may interfere with the terminal screw.
  35. 6.4.0 – 6.4.4

    Slide 36 - 6.4.0 – 6.4.4

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Terminal Blocks
    • • Terminal blocks are available with a variety of connection types.
    • • Clamp-type, spring-loaded, and screw-type terminal blocks are common.
  36. 6.4.0 – 6.4.4

    Slide 37 - 6.4.0 – 6.4.4

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Routing Cabling
    • • When multiple cables are installed, tie them neatly to a support without blocking access to other terminal blocks.
    • • Take care to avoid routing cable over sharp edges or at tight angles.
    • • To minimize interference, avoid wire crossovers whenever possible.
  37. 6.4.0 – 6.4.4

    Slide 38 - 6.4.0 – 6.4.4

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Terminal Bend Radius
    • Do not bend terminals more than 30 degrees above or below the termination point.
    • Performance Task
    • Trainees practice terminating conductors on a terminal strip.
  38. 7.0.0

    Slide 39 - 7.0.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Bending Cable and Training Conductors
    • • Training is the positioning of cable so that it is not under tension.
    • • Proper bending and training is essential to ensure that the conductor maintains its electrical characteristics over the expected service life. Ratchet and hydraulic benders are commonly used to bend large cable to the desired radius for installation.
  39. 7.0.0

    Slide 40 - 7.0.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Hydraulic Bender
  40. 7.0.0

    Slide 41 - 7.0.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Minimum Wire Bending Space for Conductors Not Entering or Leaving Opposite Wall
    • NEC Table 312.6(A) provides the minimum wire bending space required for conductors not entering or leaving the opposite wall of an enclosure.
  41. 7.0.0

    Slide 42 - 7.0.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Bending Space at Terminals is Measured in a Straight Line
  42. 7.0.0

    Slide 43 - 7.0.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Conductors Entering an Enclosure Opposite the Conductor Terminals
  43. 7.0.0

    Slide 44 - 7.0.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Minimum Wire Bending Space for Conductors Entering or Leaving Opposite Wall
    • NEC Table 312.6(B) provides the minimum wire bending space required for conductors entering or leaving the opposite wall of an enclosure.
  44. 8.0.0 – 8.1.3

    Slide 45 - 8.0.0 – 8.1.3

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • NEC® Termination Requirements
    • • NEC Sections 110.14 and 312.6 provide the minimum requirements for the safe termination of conductors and enclosures.
    • • Overcurrent requirements can be found in NEC Section 240.21.
  45. 8.0.0 – 8.1.3

    Slide 46 - 8.0.0 – 8.1.3

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • MCC Fed Directly from a Transformer Secondary
    • Next Session…
    • Taping Electrical Joints
  46. 9.0.0

    Slide 47 - 9.0.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Taping Electrical Joints
  47. 9.0.0

    Slide 48 - 9.0.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Typical Method of Taping a Split-Bolt Connector
  48. 9.0.0

    Slide 49 - 9.0.0

    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • Motor Connection Kits
    • • Motor connection kits are available to insulate bolted splice connections.
    • • These kits eliminate the need for taping and the use of filler tape or putty.
  49. 9.0.0

    Slide 50 - 9.0.0

    • Motor Connection Kits Installed on Splices
    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
    • • One common type of motor connection kit is a simple heat-shrink insulator.
    • • It is slid over the bolted connection and then heat is applied to insulate the splice.
    • Performance Task
    • Trainees practice insulating selected types of wire splices and/or installing a motor connection kit.
  50. Wrap Up

    Slide 51 - Wrap Up

    • 3-2-1
    • 3 – Write 3 important things learned during class
    • 2 – Write 2 questions you have about the material
    • 1 – Write 1 thought you had about the material
    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14
  51. Next Session…

    Slide 52 - Next Session…

    • MODULE EXAM
    • Review the complete module to prepare for the module exam. Complete the Module Review as a study aid.
    • Conductor Terminations and Splices 26208-14