CH3 SVmix_Part2

Chapter 3, Part 2

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CH3 SVmix_Part2

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Chapter 3, Part 2
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Slide Content
  1. Universal Serial Bus (USB)

    Slide 1 - Universal Serial Bus (USB)

    • Default built-in serial bus for most motherboards
    • USB can support up to 127 external devices
    • Connect a USB peripheral
    • To a USB port on the PC
    • To a USB hub that is then connected to a USB port on the PC
    • http://www.etinc.com/86/Appliance-USB-Demo
    • www.brighthub.com
    • I’m copper too 
  2. USB Versions

    Slide 2 - USB Versions

    • 1.0
    • Updated version 1.1 was widely adopted
    • 2.0
    • Known as high-speed USB
    • Maximum data rate of 480 mbps
    • Maximum cable length of 5 meters
    • 3.0
    • Up to 4.8 gbps (gigabits per second) data transfers rate
    • Coming (2015)
    • www.totalphase.com
    • 3.1
    • The USB Type-C connector, which governs ports and cables, will be smaller than typical USB ports on PCs but bigger than those on mobile phones.
    • http://www.cnet.com/news/meet-the-next-gen-usb-cable-that-could-sweep-away-all-others
  3. Plenum versus Non-Plenum

    Slide 3 - Plenum versus Non-Plenum

    • Plenum is space between ceiling of one story and floor of the next story
    • Cables run through plenum
    • Must be plenum-rated
    • Composed of materials that do not release deadly gases when burned
    • Insulating material in the cable cannot burn so quickly that it acts as a wick
    • https://www.pinterest.com/pin/572590540095746532/
    • www.portlandoregon.gov
  4. Problems and Limitations Related to Copper

    Slide 4 - Problems and Limitations Related to Copper

    • Electromagnetic interference
    • Speed
    • Distance limitations
    • Duplexing
  5. Electromagnetic Interference Limitation on Copper

    Slide 5 - Electromagnetic Interference Limitation on Copper

    • Two wires next to each other create a magnetic field, result is noise
    • Copper media interference called Electromagnetic Interference (EMI)
    • Can result in:
    • Attenuation
    • Crosstalk
    • Security and electromagnetism
    • www.siemon.com
    • Crosstalk
    • Attenuation
    • www.tech-faq.com
    • pluto.ksi.edu
  6. Speed Limitation of Copper

    Slide 6 - Speed Limitation of Copper

    • Bandwidth
    • Amount or number of signals that a wire can carry
    • Latency
    • Time delay
    • Throughput
    • Amount of actual data carried at any given time during a connection
    • As we will see, fiber optic has speeds superior to copper
  7. Distance Limitations of Copper

    Slide 7 - Distance Limitations of Copper

    • Some cables are prone to attenuation
    • Caused by:
    • Distance signals have to travel
    • The medium itself
    • Noise on cable contributes to attenuation
    • Cables have maximum segment lengths to reduce attenuation
    • Unshielded twisted-pair cable is 328 feet (100 meters)
    • Attenuation in CAT 5e when length exceeds 100 meters
    • http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1274094
  8. Duplexing Limitations in Older Copper

    Slide 8 - Duplexing Limitations in Older Copper

    • http://completeguideforcn.blogspot.com/2014_09_01_archive.html
    • Simplex
    • Device can send or receive,
    • but not both at the same time
    • Half-duplex
    • Device can send or receive,
    • but not both at the same time
    • Full duplex
    • Device can send or receive,
    • the same time
  9. Fiber-Optic Cabling

    Slide 9 - Fiber-Optic Cabling

    • Transmits digital signals using light impulses rather than electricity
    • Immune to electromagnetic Interference (EMI) and Radio Frequency Interference (RFI)
    • Works by allowing light impulses to be carried through either a glass or plastic core
    • Is single-mode fiber (SMF) or multimode fiber (MMF)
  10. Fiber-Optic Cabling Pros, Cons, and Types

    Slide 10 - Fiber-Optic Cabling Pros, Cons, and Types

    • Pros
    • Immune to EMI (Electromagnetic Interference and RFI (Radio Frequency Interference)
    • Can transmit up to 40 kilometers, about 25 miles, in a single hop
    • (a “hop” is the distance to the next repeater device to repeat the signal)
    • Cons
    • Difficult to install
    • More expensive than twisted-pair
    • Troubleshooting equipment is expensive
    • More difficult to troubleshoot
    • 2 Types of Fiber Optic – multimode and single-mode (see next slides)
  11. Multimode Fiber

    Slide 11 - Multimode Fiber

    • A type of fiber-optic cable that uses light to communicate a signal
    • Light is dispersed on numerous paths as it travels through the core and is reflected back
    • Cladding used to line the core and focus the light back onto it
    • Provides high bandwidth at high speeds over medium distances (up to about 3,000 feet)
    • forum.overclock3d.net
  12. Single-mode fiber (SMF)

    Slide 12 - Single-mode fiber (SMF)

    • A very high-speed, long-distance fiber-optic cable
    • Consists of one or two strands of fiberglass that carries the signals
    • Lasers are primary light sources
    • Spans very long distances because it can transmit data 50 times farther than multimode fiber at a faster rate
    • “This type of fiber is commonly used for connecting WAN locations. SMFs specifications make it more expensive, so it is rarely used for short connections”
    • http://fiberbit.com.tw/theory-of-single-mode-to-multi-mode-converters
  13. How Does Fiber Connect – Fiber-Optic Subscriber Connector (SC)

    Slide 13 - How Does Fiber Connect – Fiber-Optic Subscriber Connector (SC)

    • Subscriber connections use latch (male/female) ends
    • Work with single-mode and multimode optical fibers
    • Last for around 1,000 matings
  14. How Does Fiber Connect – Fiber-Optic Straight Tip (ST) Connector

    Slide 14 - How Does Fiber Connect – Fiber-Optic Straight Tip (ST) Connector

    • One of the most widely used fiber-optic connectors
    • Uses a BNC style attachment
    • Note that “BNC” stands for Bayonet Neil-Concelman, or sometimes British Naval Connector) connector. The original BNC connector was used with 10Base-2 Thinnet – copper wiring – discussed earlier in the chapter. Here we are referring to a type of connector (the Straight-Tip) that is similar. http://searchnetworking.techtarget.com/definition/BNC
  15. How Does Fiber Connect –Fiber-Optic Small Form Factor Connector

    Slide 15 - How Does Fiber Connect –Fiber-Optic Small Form Factor Connector

    • Allows more fiber-optic terminations in the same amount of space than its standard-sized counterparts
    • Two most common versions:
    • Mechanical transfer registered jack (MT-RJ or MTRJ)
    • Local connector (LC) – see below
    • LC – Local Connector
    • The newer style of Small Form Factor fiber-optic connector
    • Used for fast storage area networks and Gigabit Ethernet Adapters
  16. What’s Involved in Installing Wiring Distributions

    Slide 16 - What’s Involved in Installing Wiring Distributions

    • Many components involved in wiring a computer network
    • There are standards – for “Structured Cabling”, which specify how some of the components are laid out
    • Cables and connectors
    • Cross-connects (see next slide)
    • Patch panels (see slide later)
    • Jacks
    • Devices that connectors connect to
    • Both Horizontal Cabling and Vertical Cabling (see next slide)