3.5 Amending the U.S. Constitution 3.5 pptx

Civics
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3.5 Amending the U.S. Constitution 3.5 pptx

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  1. Amending the U.S. Constitution-3.5

    Slide 1 - Amending the U.S. Constitution-3.5

    • Recognize the methods used to propose and ratify amendments to the U.S. Constitution
    • Identify the correct sequence of each amendment process
    • Identify the importance of a formal amendment process
    • Recognize the significance of the difficulty of formally amending the U.S. Constitution
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  3. How can the united states constitution be amended?  Why is the amendment process difficult?

    Slide 3 - How can the united states constitution be amended? Why is the amendment process difficult?

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  7. The amendment process

    Slide 7 - The amendment process

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  8. Who: House of Representatives

    Slide 8 - Who: House of Representatives

    • Number: 287
    • Who: State Legislatures
    • Number: 2/3 or 33
    • Who: Senate
    • Number: 66
    • Who: State Legislatures or State Conventions
    • Number: ¾ or 38
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  14. 19th Amendment

    Slide 14 - 19th Amendment

    • Summarize specific examples from the text explaining the difficulties associated with getting the amendment ratified.
    • Paragraph Number
    • Summary of Text
    • 1848 – Seneca Falls, NY Convention, a proposal for woman suffrage passed at the convention
    • Post Civil War – Stanton and Anthony fought to have women included in the 14th and 15th amendments
    • 1872 – Susan B. Anthony was arrested, convicted, and fined for trying to vote
    • 1875 – the Supreme Court said that states were not required to allow women to vote
    • Early 1900s - Carrie Chapman Catt and the National American Woman Suffrage Association lobbied government and Alice Paul and the National Woman’s Party participated in civil disobedience as methods of fighting for suffrage
    • 1919 – the 19th Amendment was ratified by Congress but did not get enough state-level ratifications. States’-rights advocates, the liquor lobby, some businesses and some women opposed the ratification
    • 1920 - The amendment was decided by one vote, that of 24-year-old legislator Harry Burn, who voted "yes" in response to a letter from his mother saying, "Hurrah, and vote for suffrage!"
    • August 26, 1920 – the 19th Amendment was officially ratified. 72 years after the Seneca Falls Convention
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  15. Equal Rights Amendment

    Slide 15 - Equal Rights Amendment

    • Cite specific examples from the text explaining the difficulties associated with getting the amendment ratified.
    • Paragraph Number
    • Summary of Text
    • 1923 – Alice Paul believed in a Equal Rights Amendment that would provide freedom from legal sex discrimination
    • The amendment was introduced in every session of Congress and passed in 1972 (49 years later)
    • 1943 – Alice Paul changed the wording of the ERA to have a similar qualities to the 15th and 19th amendments
    • 1960s – women organized and began to demand for the ERA
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  16.  

    Slide 16

    • 1972 – ERA passed both houses of Congress. Congress placed a 7 year deadline on the ratification process. 22 states ratified the ERA in the first year.
    • 1973-1976 – ratifications slowed down and opposition began to increase. Eight ratifications in 1973, three in 1974, one in 1975 and zero in 1976
    • Many different groups opposed ratification: Anti-ERA organizers, states’-rights advocates, religious groups
    • Stated began to delay ratification and decided not to ratify
    • 1979 – As the ratification deadline approached, supporters asked for the deadline to be extended. The deadline was extended to June 30, 1982
    • Supporters of the ERA increased lobbying, petitioning, rallies, walkathons, fundraisers and even hunger strikes
    • The Equal Rights Amendment did not succeed in getting ratified. The amendment was unable to get three more states to ratify before the deadline
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  18. Equal Rights Amendment

    Slide 18 - Equal Rights Amendment

    • Cite specific examples from the text explaining the difficulties associated with getting the amendment ratified.
    • Paragraph Number
    • Summary of Text
    • 1923 – Alice Paul believed in a Equal Rights Amendment that would provide freedom from legal sex discrimination
    • The amendment was introduced in every session of Congress and passed in 1972 (49 years later)
    • 1943 – Alice Paul changed the wording of the ERA to have a similar qualities to the 15th and 19th amendments
    • 1960s – women organized and began to demand for the ERA
    • 1/5/2015
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    Slide 19

    • 1972 – ERA passed both houses of Congress. Congress placed a 7 year deadline on the ratification process. 22 states ratified the ERA in the first year.
    • 1973-1976 – ratifications slowed down and opposition began to increase. Eight ratifications in 1973, three in 1974, one in 1975 and zero in 1976
    • Many different groups opposed ratification: Anti-ERA organizers, states’-rights advocates, religious groups
    • Stated began to delay ratification and decided not to ratify
    • 1979 – As the ratification deadline approached, supporters asked for the deadline to be extended. The deadline was extended to June 30, 1982
    • Supporters of the ERA increased lobbying, petitioning, rallies, walkathons, fundraisers and even hunger strikes
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    • Checking for Understanding (Formative Assessment):
    • Write a well-crafted informative response using one of the following prompts:
    • Prompt 1
    • The U.S. Constitution has been amended 27 times out of over 11,000 proposals introduced. Based on what you have learned and citing specific examples from the video, “Article V of the U.S. Constitution” reading and the “Women’s Rights Case Study,” write to explain why there is a low success rate of amending the U.S. Constitution.
    • Prompt 2
    • How do the video, “Article V of the U.S. Constitution” reading, and “Women’s Rights Case Study” support the idea that it is difficult to make a change to the U.S. Constitution? Support your writing with specific examples from each source.
    • Extension Suggestion: