American Born Chinese-Intro to Novel Lesson_jved

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American Born Chinese-Intro to Novel Lesson_jved

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  1. Slide 1

    • Imagine you're one of a handful of Asians in a mostly white, suburban, American junior high school. All you want in life is to get with your crush, the super-popular, hot blonde, but you're nothing special as far as teenagers go. Plus, you're not just Asian; you're Chinese. Cue a stream of classic Chinese stereotypes. Okay sure, technically you're Chinese-American, but do you think anyone at school, never mind your crush, understands or cares about that distinction?
    • Author Gene Yang bets that you might care about what Jin, his teenage boy protagonist, is all about. After all, what Jin goes through isn't all that different from what a lot of teenagers go through.
    • American Born Chinese
  2. Slide 2

    • Unless you managed to skip those awkward teenage years, there's just no way that you can't relate to Jin Wang's struggles to fit in at his mostly-white junior high.
    • Racial background and the cultural stereotypes play a big role in this story, as they are the reason Jin is a social outcast at school. Whereas other characters deal with differences in class or taste in clothing, Jin has to deal with something he really can't do anything about: his biological makeup.
    • Jin's journey through the novel intersects with the story of the Monkey King, a classic Chinese folk tale, and it also shows us how it is possible to survive the teen years.
    • Jin's story isn't exactly pretty or simple. It is, however, very inspirational in the end.
    • Why Should I Care?
  3. Slide 3

    • Lesson Objectives
    • Essential Question: How can you stay true to yourself in the face of judgement from your peers?
    • By the end of the lesson, you will be able to:
    • Understand the background of American Born Chinese
    • Reflect on the themes of American Born Chinese
    • State Standard(s):
    • CC.1.3.9-10.A: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
    • CC.1.3.9-10.C: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
    • CC.1.3.9-10.H: Analyze how an author draws on and transforms themes, topics, character types, and/or other text elements from source material in a specific work.
    • Student Terms: Analyze characters and themes and their development throughout a story.
  4. Slide 4

    • Vocabulary
    • You should be able to define these terms by the end of the lesson:
    • Theme
    • Identity
    • Betrayal
    • Let’s review our vocab terms, class!
  5. Slide 5

    • Warm-Up
    • Describe yourself in one word. Are you happy with this description? Would others agree with you?
    • Now read the following quote:
    • “It’s easy to become anything you wish, so long as you’re willing to forfeit your soul.”
    • What do you think this means?
    • How do you think it relates to the way you’ve described yourself and how others see you?
  6. Slide 6

    • Character Overview
    • Character Name
    • Brief Description
    • Jin Wang
    • Average male teenager: he's insecure about how he looks, how he acts, how he sounds.
    • The Monkey King
    • Arrogant and egotistical. He's the character that no one likes. At first, that is.
    • Danny
    • He is blond and poised for popularity at school, but his cousin Chin-Kee is ruining it for him.
    • Chin-Kee
    • Danny’s worst fears embodied. He represents everything Danny doesn't want to be associated with: the "chinky" Chinese. 
    • Wei-Chen
    • He can't dress or style his hair. His English is broken, but he's the kind of supportive friend you want in your corner, especially when things go bad.
  7. Slide 7

    • Character Overview
    • Character Name
    • Brief Description
    • Suzy Nakamura
    • Wei-Chen's girlfriend. She's sensitive and smart and, like Jin, sick of being viewed like an outsider because of her race.
    • Amelia Harris
    • Jin’s crush. She drives him, unknowingly, to try and be someone he’s not. She’s a nice, popular white girl who hangs out with Greg.
    • Greg
    • A jerk who wasn’t always a jerk. What happened?
    • Tze-Yo-Tzuh
    • The Chinese version of God. He’s everywhere and nowhere, the creator of all Earth, and powerful.
    • Wong Lai Tsao
    • A humble, kind monk who does good and inspires others to do good too. The model for perfect kindness and humility; the true ego-less character.
  8. Slide 8

    • Plot Overview
    • Even though this book is mainly about Jin, the book actually starts with the story of the Monkey King. The book then switches to Jin's story in the second chapter and, for the third chapter, switches to the story of Danny. Only after Jin's and Danny's stories do we return to the Monkey King. This pattern continues through the end of the novel.
    • Chapter 1: Monkey King
    • Chapter 2: Jin
    • Chapter 3: Danny
    • Chapter 4: Monkey King
    • Chapter 5: Jin
    • Chapter 6: Danny
    • Chapter 7: Monkey King
    • Chapter 8: Jin
    • Chapter 9: Danny
  9. Slide 9

    • Quick Check
    • Can you give a brief summary of what you’ll be reading about in ABC?
  10. Slide 10

    • Review
    • Theme: the lesson(s) we learn from a story; the search for meaning.
    • While reading American Born Chinese, we’ll be exploring some of the following themes:
    • Identity and appearances
    • Betrayal
  11. Slide 11

    • ABC Themes: Identity
    • Identity: a person’s thoughts, feelings, or perceptions about themselves.
    • What can influence or affect someone’s identity?
    • Race
    • Class
    • Religion
    • Personal Experiences
    • Gender
    • Physical Appearance
  12. Slide 12

    • People often base their identity on the way they look or the way society says we should or shouldn’t look.
    • Appearances in American Born Chinese are what drive the entire plot of the book. The book hinges on some key twists, all of which involve the making and unmaking of the Chinese appearance.
    • Think about your identity. Is your appearance part of your identity?
    • Consider the following statements:
    • You shouldn't change your appearance because it's who you are.
    • Your appearance is important because it determines how other people treat you and, thus, is a way for you to define yourself.
    • Identity and Appearance
  13. Slide 13

    • ABC Themes: Betrayal
    • Betrayal: the breaking of a contract, trust, or confidence within a relationship of individuals, between organizations, or between individuals and organizations.
  14. Slide 14

    • Betrayal in American Born Chinese isn’t just about betraying a good friend but more about betraying oneself.
    • Jin betrays his best friend but why?
    • The Monkey King betrays his subjects but why?
    • Consider the following statements:
    • Betraying someone you love is worse than betraying yourself.
    • Betraying yourself is worse than betraying someone you love.
    • Betrayal
  15. Slide 15

    • Quick Check
    • What are two of the major themes we’ll be discussing in ABC?
    • Identity
    • Betrayal
  16. Slide 16

    • Remember
    • Theme is the lesson(s) we learn from a story; the search for meaning.
    • Identity is a person’s thoughts, feelings, or perceptions about themselves.
    • Betrayal is the breaking of a contract, trust, or confidence within a relationship of individuals, between organizations, or between individuals and organizations.
    • We’ll be exploring these themes while reading about Jin, the Monkey King, and Danny as they try to find their true identity.
    • How can you stay true to yourself in the face of judgement by your peers?
  17. Slide 17

    • Review ObjectivesCan You Do It?
    • Understand the background of American Born Chinese
    • Reflect on the themes of American Born Chinese
  18. Slide 18

    • For extra credit:
    • Create a self-portrait made up of objects, symbols, and/or imagery that represent key elements of your identity.
    • You can create this in any format that you’d like (Word, Publisher, Paint, etc.).
    • E-mail your assignment to your teacher.
    • Dig Deeper
  19. We’ll begin our journey through American Born Chinese!

    Slide 19 - We’ll begin our journey through American Born Chinese!

    • What’s Next?