11 SURVEY OF 1 CORINTHIANS AND 2 CORINTHIANS audio

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11 SURVEY OF 1 CORINTHIANS AND 2 CORINTHIANS audio

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  1. 2015 Spring Study

    Slide 1 - 2015 Spring Study

    • “Preparing For The Future”
    • Session 11:
    • Survey of 1 and 2 Corinthians
  2. 2015 Spring Study

    Slide 3 - 2015 Spring Study

    • “Preparing For The Future”
    • Session 11: Survey of 1 and 2 Corinthians
    • Survey
    • Look at an outline
    • Study the theme
    • Look some problem passages
  3. Slide 4

    • FAUSSET'S BIBLE DICTIONARY
    • ByA. R. FAUSSET(Andrew Robert Fausset, 1821-1910)
    • Co-Author ofJamieson, Fausset and Brown'sCOMMENTARY ON THE WHOLE BIBLE
  4. THE FIRST EPISTLE TO THE CORINTHIANS.

    Slide 5 - THE FIRST EPISTLE TO THE CORINTHIANS.

    • Its authenticity is attested by Clement of Rome (Ep., c. 47), Polycarp (Ep. to Philipp., c. 11), Ignatius (ad Eph., 2), and Irenaeus (Adv. Haer., 4:27, section 3).
    • Its occasion and subject. Paul had been instrumental in converting many Gentiles (1 Cor 12:2) and some Jews (Acts 18:8), notwithstanding the Jews' opposition (Acts 18:5-6), during his one year and a half sojourn. The converts were mostly of the humbler classes (1 Cor 1:26). Crispus, Erastus, and Gaius (Caius), however, were men of rank (1 Cor 1:14; Acts 18:8; Rom 16:23). 1 Cor 11:22 implies a variety of classes. The immoralities abounding outside at Corinth, and the craving even within the church for Greek philosophy and rhetoric which Apollos' eloquent style gratified, rather than for the simple preaching of Christ crucified (1 Cor 2:1, etc.; Acts 18:24, etc.), as also the opposition of Judaizing teachers who boasted of having "letters of commendation" from Jerusalem the metropolis of the faith, caused the apostle anxiety.
  5. The Judaizers depreciated his apostolic authority (1 Cor 9:1-2; 2 Cor 10:1,7-8), professing, some to be the followers of the chief apostle, Cephas; others to belong to Christ Himself, rejecting all subordinate teaching (1 Cor 1:12; 2 Cor 10:7). Some gave themselves out to be apostles (2 Cor 11:5,13), alleging that Paul was not of the twelve nor an eye-witness of the gospel facts, and did not dare to prove his apostleship by claiming support from the church (1 Cor 9). Even those who declared themselves Paul's followers did so in a party spirit, glorying in the minister instead of in Christ. Apollos' followers also rested too much on his Alexandrian rhetoric, to the disparagement of Paul, who studied simplicity lest aught should interpose between the Corinthians and the Spirit's demonstration of the Savior (1 Cor 2). Epicurean self-indulgence led some to deny the resurrection (1 Cor 15:32). Hence, they connived at the incest of one of them with his stepmother (1 Cor 5).

    Slide 6 - The Judaizers depreciated his apostolic authority (1 Cor 9:1-2; 2 Cor 10:1,7-8), professing, some to be the followers of the chief apostle, Cephas; others to belong to Christ Himself, rejecting all subordinate teaching (1 Cor 1:12; 2 Cor 10:7). Some gave themselves out to be apostles (2 Cor 11:5,13), alleging that Paul was not of the twelve nor an eye-witness of the gospel facts, and did not dare to prove his apostleship by claiming support from the church (1 Cor 9). Even those who declared themselves Paul's followers did so in a party spirit, glorying in the minister instead of in Christ. Apollos' followers also rested too much on his Alexandrian rhetoric, to the disparagement of Paul, who studied simplicity lest aught should interpose between the Corinthians and the Spirit's demonstration of the Savior (1 Cor 2). Epicurean self-indulgence led some to deny the resurrection (1 Cor 15:32). Hence, they connived at the incest of one of them with his stepmother (1 Cor 5).

    • The elders of the church had written to consult Paul on minor points: (1) meats offered to idols; (2) celibacy and marriage; (3) the proper use of spiritual gifts in public worship; (4) the collection for the saints at Jerusalem (1 Cor 16:1, etc.). But they never told him about the serious evils, which came to his ears only through some of the household of Chloe (1 Cor 1:11), contentions, divisions, lawsuits brought before pagan courts by Christian brethren against brethren (1 Cor 6:1). Moreover, some abused spiritual gifts to display and fanaticism (1 Cor 14); simultaneous ministrations interrupted the seemly order of public worship; women spoke unveiled, in violation of eastern usage, and usurped the office of men; even the Holy Communion was desecrated by reveling (1 Cor 11). These then formed topics of his epistle, and occasioned his sending Timothy to them after his journey to Macedonia (1 Cor 4:17).
  6. In 1 Cor 4:18; 5:9, he implies that he had sent a previous letter to them; probably enjoining also a contribution for the poor saints at Jerusalem. Upon their asking directions as to the mode, he now replies (1 Cor 16:2). In it he also announced his design of visiting them on his way to and from Macedon (2 Cor 1:15-16), which design he changed on hearing the unfavorable report from Chloe's household (1 Cor 16:5-7), for which he was charged with fickleness (2 Cor 1:15-17). Alford remarks, Paul in 1 Corinthians alludes to the fornication only in a summary way, as if replying to an excuse set up after his rebuke, rather than introducing it for the first time.

    Slide 7 - In 1 Cor 4:18; 5:9, he implies that he had sent a previous letter to them; probably enjoining also a contribution for the poor saints at Jerusalem. Upon their asking directions as to the mode, he now replies (1 Cor 16:2). In it he also announced his design of visiting them on his way to and from Macedon (2 Cor 1:15-16), which design he changed on hearing the unfavorable report from Chloe's household (1 Cor 16:5-7), for which he was charged with fickleness (2 Cor 1:15-17). Alford remarks, Paul in 1 Corinthians alludes to the fornication only in a summary way, as if replying to an excuse set up after his rebuke, rather than introducing it for the first time.

    • Before this former letter, he paid a second visit (probably during his three years' sojourn at Ephesus, from which he could pass readily by sea to Corinth Acts 19:10; 20:31); for in 2 Cor 12:14; 13:1, he declares his intention to pay a third visit. In 1 Cor 13:2 translated "I have already said (at my second visit), and declare now beforehand, as (I did) when I was present the second time, so also (I declare) now in my absence to them who have heretofore sinned (namely, before my second visit, 1 Cor 12:21) and to all others" (who have sinned since it, or are in danger of sinning).
  7. "I write," the Alexandrinus, Vaticanus, and Sinaiticus manuscripts rightly omit; KJV "as if I were present the second time," namely, this time, is inconsistent with verse 1, "this is the third time I am coming" (compare 2 Cor 1:15-16).

    Slide 8 - "I write," the Alexandrinus, Vaticanus, and Sinaiticus manuscripts rightly omit; KJV "as if I were present the second time," namely, this time, is inconsistent with verse 1, "this is the third time I am coming" (compare 2 Cor 1:15-16).

    • The second visit was a painful one, owing to the misconduct of many of his converts (2 Cor 2:1). Then followed his letter before the 1 Corinthians, charging them "not to company with fornicators." In 1 Cor 5:9-12 he corrects their misapprehensions of that injunction. The Acts omits that second visit, as it omits other incidents of Paul's life, e.g. his visit to Arabia (Gal 1:17-18).
    • The place of writing was Ephesus (1 Cor 16:8). The English subscription "from Philippi" arose from mistranslating 1 Cor 16:5, "I am passing through Macedonia;" he intended (1 Cor 16:8) leaving Ephesus after Pentecost that year. He left it about A.D. 57 (Acts 19:21). The Passover imagery makes it likely the date was Easter time (1 Cor 5:7), A.D. 57. Just before his conflict with the beastlike mob of Ephesus, 1 Cor 15:32 implies that already he had premonitory symptoms; the storm was gathering, his "adversaries many" (1 Cor 16:9; Rom 16:4). The tumult (Acts 19:29-30) had not yet taken place, for immediately after it he left Ephesus for Macedon.
  8. Sosthenes, the ruler of the Jews' synagogue, after being beaten, seems to have been won by Paul's love to an adversary in affliction (Acts 18:12-17). Converted, like Crispus his predecessor in office, he is joined with Paul in the inscription, as "our brother." A marvelous triumph of Christian love! Paul's persecutor paid in his own coin by the Greeks, before Gallio's eyes, and then subdued to Christ by the love of him whom he sought to persecute. Stephanas, Fortunatus, and Achaicus, were probably the bearers of the epistle (1 Cor 16:17-18).

    Slide 9 - Sosthenes, the ruler of the Jews' synagogue, after being beaten, seems to have been won by Paul's love to an adversary in affliction (Acts 18:12-17). Converted, like Crispus his predecessor in office, he is joined with Paul in the inscription, as "our brother." A marvelous triumph of Christian love! Paul's persecutor paid in his own coin by the Greeks, before Gallio's eyes, and then subdued to Christ by the love of him whom he sought to persecute. Stephanas, Fortunatus, and Achaicus, were probably the bearers of the epistle (1 Cor 16:17-18).

    • FIRST EPISTLE TO THE CORINTHIANS.
  9. 1 CORINTHIANS WRITTEN BY PAUL

    Slide 10 - 1 CORINTHIANS WRITTEN BY PAUL

    • A.D. 57
    • DURING PAUL’S STAY AT EPHESUS
    • PAUL HAD SPENT 18 MONTHS
    • APOLLOS SPENT TIME AFTERWARDS
  10.  (1.) The apostle deals with the subject of the lamentable divisions and party strifes that had arisen among them (1 Cor 1-4).

    Slide 11 - (1.) The apostle deals with the subject of the lamentable divisions and party strifes that had arisen among them (1 Cor 1-4).

    • (2.) He next treats of certain cases of immorality that had become notorious among them. They had apparently set at nought the very first principles of morality (5; 6).
    • FIRST CORINTHIANS OUTLINE
  11.  (3.) In the third part he discusses various questions of doctrine and of Christian ethics in reply to certain communications they had made to him. He especially rectifies certain flagrant abuses regarding the celebration of the Lord's supper (7-14).

    Slide 12 - (3.) In the third part he discusses various questions of doctrine and of Christian ethics in reply to certain communications they had made to him. He especially rectifies certain flagrant abuses regarding the celebration of the Lord's supper (7-14).

    • (4.) The concluding part (15; 16) contains an elaborate defense of the doctrine of the resurrection of the dead, which had been called in question by some among them, followed by some general instructions, intimations, and greetings.
  12. KEY PASSAGE

    Slide 13 - KEY PASSAGE

    • 1 Cor 1:4-9
    • 4 I thank my God always concerning you for the grace of God which was given to you by Christ Jesus,
    • 5 that you were enriched in everything by Him in all utterance and all knowledge,
    • 6 even as the testimony of Christ was confirmed in you,
    • 7 so that you come short in no gift, eagerly waiting for the revelation of our Lord Jesus Christ,
    • 8 who will also confirm you to the end, that you may be blameless in the day of our Lord Jesus Christ.
    • 9 God is faithful, by whom you were called into the fellowship of His Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.
  13. FELLOWSHIP IN JESUS CHRIST

    Slide 14 - FELLOWSHIP IN JESUS CHRIST

    • CALLING
    • PROBLEMS
    • DIVISION 1:11-13
  14. PROBLEMS

    Slide 15 - PROBLEMS

    • PAUL IS WRITING TO THE CHURCH AT CORINTH 1:2
    • The problems were theirs
    • We have to understand the problem from their point of view before we apply this to ourselves
  15. FELLOWSHIP IN JESUS CHRIST

    Slide 16 - FELLOWSHIP IN JESUS CHRIST

    • DIVISION 1:11-1
    • Men were exalted
    • Lost Focus
  16. 1 Cor 3:5-9

    Slide 17 - 1 Cor 3:5-9

    • 5 Who then is Paul, and who is Apollos, but ministers through whom you believed, as the Lord gave to each one?
    • 6 I planted, Apollos watered, but God gave the increase.
    • 7 So then neither he who plants is anything, nor he who waters, but God who gives the increase.
    • 8 Now he who plants and he who waters are one, and each one will receive his own reward according to his own labor.
    • 9 For we are God's fellow workers; you are God's field, you are God's building.
  17. Paul and his apostleship

    Slide 18 - Paul and his apostleship

    • The prophet Apollos
    • Peter the most notable apostle
    • FIRST CORINTHIANS OUTLINE
  18. 1 Corinthians 4:1-6

    Slide 19 - 1 Corinthians 4:1-6

    • Let a man so consider us, as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God.
    • 2 Moreover it is required in stewards that one be found faithful.
    • 3 But with me it is a very small thing that I should be judged by you or by a human court.* In fact, I do not even judge myself.
    • 4 For I know of nothing against myself, yet I am not justified by this; but He who judges me is the Lord.
    • 5 Therefore judge nothing before the time, until the Lord comes, who will both bring to light the hidden things of darkness and reveal the counsels of the hearts. Then each one's praise will come from God.
    • 6 Now these things, brethren, I have figuratively transferred to myself and Apollos for your sakes, that you may learn in us not to think beyond what is written, that none of you may be puffed up on behalf of one against the other.
  19. SECOND EPISTLE TO THE CORINTHIANS.

    Slide 20 - SECOND EPISTLE TO THE CORINTHIANS.

    • Reasons for writing. To explain why he deferred his promised visit to Corinth on his way to Macedonia (1 Cor 4:19; 16:5; 2 Cor 1:15-16), and so to explain his apostolic walk, and vindicate his apostleship against gainsayers (2 Cor 1:12,24; 6:3-18; 7:2; 10; 11; 12). Also to praise them for obeying his first epistle, and to charge them to pardon the transgressor, as already punished sufficiently (2 Cor 2:1-11; 7:6-16). Also to urge them to contributions for the poor brethren at Jerusalem (2 Cor 8).
    • Its genuineness is attested by Irenaeus (Haer., 3:7, section 1), Athenagoras (De Res. Mort.), Clement of Alexandria (Strom., 3:94, 4:101), and Tertullian (Pudic., 13).
    • Time of writing. After Pentecost A.D. 57, when Paul left Ephesus for Troas. Having stayed for a time at Troas preaching with success (2 Cor 2:12-13), he went on to Macedonia to meet Titus there, since he was disappointed in not finding him at Troas as he had expected.
  20. In Macedonia he heard from him the comforting intelligence of the good effect of the first epistle upon the Corinthians, and having experienced the liberality of the Macedonian churches (2 Cor 8) he wrote this second epistle and then went on to Greece, where he stayed three months; then he reached Philippi by land about Passover or Easter,  A.D. 58 (Acts 20:1-6). So that the autumn of  A.D. 57 will be the date of 2 Corinthians.

    Slide 21 - In Macedonia he heard from him the comforting intelligence of the good effect of the first epistle upon the Corinthians, and having experienced the liberality of the Macedonian churches (2 Cor 8) he wrote this second epistle and then went on to Greece, where he stayed three months; then he reached Philippi by land about Passover or Easter, A.D. 58 (Acts 20:1-6). So that the autumn of A.D. 57 will be the date of 2 Corinthians.

    • Place of writing. Macedonia, as 2 Cor 9:2 proves. In "ASIA" (see) he had been in great peril (2 Cor 1:8-9), whether from the tumult at Ephesus (Acts 19:23-41) or a dangerous illness (Alford). Thence he passed by way of Troas to Philippi, the first city that would meet him in entering Macedonia (Acts 20:1), and the seat of the important Philippian church. On comparing 2 Cor 11:9 with Phil 4:15-16 it appears that by "Macedonia" there Paul means Philippi. The plural "churches," however, (2 Cor 8:1) proves that Paul visited other Macedonian churches also, e.g. Thessalonica and Berea. But Philippi, as the chief one, would be the center to which all the collections would be sent, and probably the place of writing 2 Corinthians Titus, who was to follow up at Corinth the collection, begun at the place of his first visit (2 Cor 8:6).
  21. The style passes rapidly from the gentle, joyous, and consolatory, to stern reproof and vindication of his apostleship against his opponents. His ardent temperament was tried by a chronic malady (2 Cor 4:7; 5:1-4; 12:7-9). Then too "the care of all the churches" pressed on him; the weight of which was added to by Judaizing emissaries at Corinth, who wished to restrict the church's freedom and catholicity by bonds of letter and form (2 Cor 3:8-18). Hence, he speaks of (2 Cor 7:5-6) "rightings without" and "fears within" until Titus brought him good news of the Corinthian church. Even then, while the majority at Corinth repented and excommunicated, at Paul's command, the incestuous person, and contributed to the Jerusalem poor fund, a minority still accused him of personal objects in the collection, though he had guarded against possibility of suspicion by having others beside himself to take charge of the money (2 Cor. 8:18-28 ). Moreover, their insinuation was inconsistent with their other charge, that his not claiming maintenance proved him to be no apostle. They alleged too that he was always threatening severe measures, but was too cowardly to execute them (2 Cor 10:8-16; 13:2); that he was inconsistent, for he had circumcised Timothy but did not circumcise Titus, a Jew among the Jews, a Greek among the Greeks (1 Cor 9:20, etc.; Gal 2:3).

    Slide 22 - The style passes rapidly from the gentle, joyous, and consolatory, to stern reproof and vindication of his apostleship against his opponents. His ardent temperament was tried by a chronic malady (2 Cor 4:7; 5:1-4; 12:7-9). Then too "the care of all the churches" pressed on him; the weight of which was added to by Judaizing emissaries at Corinth, who wished to restrict the church's freedom and catholicity by bonds of letter and form (2 Cor 3:8-18). Hence, he speaks of (2 Cor 7:5-6) "rightings without" and "fears within" until Titus brought him good news of the Corinthian church. Even then, while the majority at Corinth repented and excommunicated, at Paul's command, the incestuous person, and contributed to the Jerusalem poor fund, a minority still accused him of personal objects in the collection, though he had guarded against possibility of suspicion by having others beside himself to take charge of the money (2 Cor. 8:18-28 ). Moreover, their insinuation was inconsistent with their other charge, that his not claiming maintenance proved him to be no apostle. They alleged too that he was always threatening severe measures, but was too cowardly to execute them (2 Cor 10:8-16; 13:2); that he was inconsistent, for he had circumcised Timothy but did not circumcise Titus, a Jew among the Jews, a Greek among the Greeks (1 Cor 9:20, etc.; Gal 2:3).

    • That many of his detractors were Judaizers appears from 2 Cor 11:22. An emissary from Judaea, arrogantly assuming Christ's own title "he that cometh" (Matt 11:3), headed the party (2 Cor 11:4); he bore "epistles of commendation" (2 Cor 3:1), and boasted of pure Hebrew descent, and close connection with Christ Himself (2 Cor 11:13,22-23). His high-sounding pretensions and rhetoric contrasted with Paul's unadorned style, and carried weight with some (2 Cor 10:10,13; 11:6). The diversity in tone, in part, is due to the diversity between the penitent majority and the refractory minority. Two deputies chosen by the churches to take charge of the collection accompanied Titus, who bore this 2 Corinthians (2 Cor 8:18-22).
  22. Slide 23

    • Written by Paul months later
    • 1 Corinthians Spring A. D. 57
    • 2 Corinthians Fall A. D. 57 OR 58
    • Obeyed the first . . .
    • SECOND EPISTLE TO THE CORINTHIANS.
  23. Slide 24

    • SECOND CORINTHIANS: A Teaching Outline
    • Part One: Paul's Explanation of His Ministry (1:1—7:16) I. Introduction 1:1-11
    • II. Paul's Explanation of His Change of Plans 1:12—2:13
    • A. Paul's Original Plan 1:12-22
    • B. Paul's Change of Plans 1:23—2:4
    • C. Paul's Appeal to Forgive 2:5-13
    • III. Paul's Philosophy of Ministry 2:14—6:10
    • A. Christ Causes Us to Triumph 2:14-17
    • B. Changed Lives Prove Ministry 3:1-5
  24. Slide 25

    • C. New Covenant Is the Basis of Ministry 3:6-18
    • D. Christ Is the Theme of Ministry 4:1-7
    • E. Trials Abound in the Ministry 4:8-15
    • F. Motivation in the Ministry 4:16—5:21
    • G. Giving No Offense in the Ministry 6:1-10
    • IV. Paul's Exhortations to the Corinthians 6:11-7:16
    • A. Paul's Appeal for Reconciliation 6:11-13
    • B. Paul's Appeal for Separation from Unbelievers 6:14—7:1
    • C. Paul's Meeting with Titus 7:2-7
  25. Slide 26

    • D. Corinthians' Response to Paul's Letter 7:8-16
    • Part Two: Paul's Collection for the Saints (8:1—9:15)
    • I. Example of the Macedonians 8:1-6
    • II. Exhortation to the Corinthians 8:7—9:15
    • A. Example of Christ 8:7-9
    • B. Purpose of Giving 8:10-15
    • C. Explanation of the Delegation 8:16—9:5
    • D. Exhortation to Giving 9:6-15
  26. Slide 27

    • Part Three: Paul's Vindication of His Apostleship (10:1—13:14)
    • I. Paul Answers His Accusers 10
    • A. The Charge of Cowardice is Answered 10:1-2
    • B. The Charge of Walking in the Flesh is Answered 10:3-9 C. The Charge of Personal Weakness is Answered 10:10-18II. Paul Defends His Apostleship 11:1—12:13
    • A. Paul's Declaration of His Apostleship 11:1-15 B. Paul's Sufferings Support His Apostleship 11:16-33
  27. Slide 28

    • C. Paul's Revelations Support His Apostleship 12:1-10 D. Paul's Signs Support His Apostleship 12:11-13
    • III. Paul Announces His Forthcoming Visit 12:14—13:10
    • A. Paul's Concern Not to be a Financial Burden 12:14-18 B. Paul's Concern Not to Find Them Carnal 12:19-21 C. Paul's Warning to Examine Themselves 13:1-10IV. Conclusion 13:11-14
  28. 2 Corinthians 1:3-7

    Slide 29 - 2 Corinthians 1:3-7

    • 3 Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort,
    • 4 who comforts us in all our tribulation, that we may be able to comfort those who are in any trouble, with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God.
    • 5 For as the sufferings of Christ abound in us, so our consolation also abounds through Christ.
  29. 2 Corinthians 1:3-7

    Slide 30 - 2 Corinthians 1:3-7

    • 6 Now if we are afflicted, it is for your consolation and salvation, which is effective for enduring the same sufferings which we also suffer. Or if we are comforted, it is for your consolation and salvation.
    • 7 And our hope for you is steadfast, because we know that as you are partakers of the sufferings, so also you will partake of the consolation.
  30. 1 & 2 Corinthians

    Slide 31 - 1 & 2 Corinthians

    • Paul is the writer
    • The dates of writing fall between 57 and 58 A.D.
    • The church is troubled from without and within
    • Many problems were corrected . . .
    • This church was affected by nearly every vice . . .
    • Every problem we face today can be solve with an understanding of these two books
  31. Outline of Future 2014 Sessions

    Slide 32 - Outline of Future 2014 Sessions

    • JANUARY 2015
    • 19 Orientation
    • 26 Inspiration of Scripture
    • FEBRUARY
    • 2 Genesis Though Deuteronomy 9 Joshua Through 2 Chronicles 16 The Prophets
    • 23 The Old Testament Poetry
    • MARCH
    • NEW TESTAMENT SURVEY
    • 2 The Synoptic Gospels
    • 9 The Gospel of John
    • 16 Acts
    • 23 A Survey of Romans
    • 30 A Survey of 1st and 2nd Corinthians
    • APRIL
    • 6 A Survey of Galatians, Ephesians, Colossians,
    • Philippines.
    • 13 1st and 2nd Thessalonians, Philemon 20 1s and 2nd Timothy and Titus
    • 27 James
    • MAY
    • 4 Hebrews
    • 11 1st and 2nd Peter, Jude
    • 18 1st 2nd 3rd John
    • 25 Revelation
    • JUNE
    • 1 The Life of Christ Part 1
    • 8 The Life of Christ Part 2
    • 15 The Life of Christ Part 3
    • 22 The Teachings of Christ Part 1
    • 29 The Teachings of Christ Part 2
  32. Outline of Future 2014 Sessions

    Slide 33 - Outline of Future 2014 Sessions

    • JULY 2015
    • 6 The Gospel of Christ
    • 13 Examples of Conversion
    • 20 Process of Conversion Part 1
    • 27 Process of Conversion Part 2
    • AUGUST
    • 3 “I’m A New Man” (New Creature)
    • 10 The Christ, The Cross, and The
    • Church
    • 17 The Establishment of The Church
    • 24 The Identity of The Church
    • 31 New Testament Worship
    • SEPTEMBER
    • 7 Authority, The Pattern, and
    • Innovation (1)
    • 14 Authority, The Pattern, and
    • Innovation (2)
    • 21 Authority, The Pattern, and
    • Innovation (3)
    • 28 Basis For Christian Unity
    • OCTOBER
    • 5 Fellowship
    • 12 Spiritual Gifts and Miracles
    • 19 Church Government
    • 26 Church Discipline
    • NOVEMBER
    • 2 Discipleship
    • 9 Works of Flesh and Fruits of Spirit
    • 16 Love & The Law of Love
    • 23 CLOSED FOR HOLIDAY
    • 30 The Christian Graces
    • DECEMBER
    • 7 The Devil and Temptation
    • 14 The Holy Spirit