Reading With Expression

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Reading With Expression

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  1. Reading With Expression

    Slide 1 - Reading With Expression

    • Tips for Becoming a Fluent Reader with Mrs. Hood
  2. Expressive readers change pitch.

    Slide 2 - Expressive readers change pitch.

    • What is pitch?
    • In music=high & low
    • With Voice=up & down
  3. Pitch Example

    Slide 3 - Pitch Example

    • Taken from The Good, the Bad and the Goofy by Jon Scieszka.
    • High noon. A hot dry wind blows across the prairie. “Where the heck are we?” asks Cooky. “Cheyenne country,” says Cowboy Bob.
    • An arrow whizzes out of nowhere and sticks in the side of the chuck wagon. Cowboy Bob calmly pulls it out and looks at it. (pg. 1)
  4. Expressive readers change rhythm.

    Slide 4 - Expressive readers change rhythm.

    • What is rhythm?
    • Rhythm=speeding up & slowing down
  5. Rhythm Example

    Slide 5 - Rhythm Example

    • Taken from Meanwhile Back at the Ranch by Trinka Hakes Noble.
    • Meanwhile….back at the ranch….The cat had just had kittens in Elna’s sewing basket when the phone rang. “Hello?” “Mrs. Elna Hicks?” “Yes.” “Mrs. Hicks, you have just won a brand-new wall-to-wall frost-free super-cool refrigerator with a built in automatic food maker! “Why I never!” exclaimed Elna. “The delivery men are on their way.”
  6. Expressive readers change volume.

    Slide 6 - Expressive readers change volume.

    • What is volume?
    • Volume= soft & loud
  7. Volume Example

    Slide 7 - Volume Example

    • Taken from Junie B. Jones Loves Handsome Warren by Barbara Park
    • “Yeah, only pretend I didn’t even tell you that,” I said very soft. After that, me and that Grace looked for Lucille some more. And guess what? I spotted her! That’s what! “HEY, GRACE! I SEE HER! I SEE LUCILLE! SHE IS RUNNING PAST THE WATER FOUNTAIN!
  8. Expressive readers change tone.

    Slide 8 - Expressive readers change tone.

    • What is tone?
    • Tone= emotion-sad, angry, soft, sweet, etc.
  9. Tone Example

    Slide 9 - Tone Example

    • Taken from The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
    • Starting in chapter 2 from “Oh, Mr. Tumnus—I’m so sorry to stop you, and I do love that tune—but really, I must go home. I only meant to stay for a few minutes.”
  10. Expressive readers slow down.

    Slide 10 - Expressive readers slow down.

    • Feel too slow=then you’re just right.
  11. Slow down example

    Slide 11 - Slow down example

    • Taken from The Three Little Pigs and the Somewhat Bad Wolf by Mark Teague
    • Soon he came to a straw house. It smelled like pig. “I like pig,” he said, not in a friendly way. He banged on the door. “Who is it?” called the first pig. “The wolf. Open up, or I’ll blow your house down!” “I think the door is stuck,” said the pig. So the wolf HUFFED…And he PUFFED…AND HE BLEW THE HOUSE DOWN! “I can’t believe that worked!” he said. He had never blown down a house before.
  12. Expressive readers repeat

    Slide 12 - Expressive readers repeat

    • Mess Up? Say it again!
  13. Repeat example

    Slide 13 - Repeat example

    • Taken from Krakatoa by Kathy Furgang
    • Imagine a country in the middle of the ocean that is made up of more than 13,500 tiny islands. This is what the country of Indonesia is like. Indonesia is in the Pacific Ocean between Asia and Australia. ….A volcano in Indonesia, called Krakatoa, is one of the most famous volcanoes in the world.
  14. Expressive readers pay attention to punctuation!

    Slide 14 - Expressive readers pay attention to punctuation!

    • ?=voice goes up at the end.
    • !=voice goes up and get louder
    • ,,,=voice pauses
  15. Punctuation example

    Slide 15 - Punctuation example

    • Taken from The Not-So-Jolly Roger by Jon Scieszka
    • Fred gulped. “Uh…Eenie, meenie, mynie, mo. Catch a pirate by the toe. If he hollers, let him go. Eenie, meenie, mynie, mo!” Fred pointed to Sam. “Sam will now show you his powerful magic!” The pirate wasn’t smiling anymore. Sam stepped forward on wobbly legs. “Uh…hi, there, uh…Mr. Blackbeard,” said Sam. The pirate’s dark face went suddenly white, “How do you know my name?” “I read it,” Sam said. “Where’s your crystal ball?” “Oh, I don’t need one. I even know your real name.” “Do you now?” Blackbeard looked around, then bent forward. “And what might it be?”
  16. Expressive readers emphasize important words.

    Slide 16 - Expressive readers emphasize important words.

    • Key words=say them with more force.
  17. Important Words example

    Slide 17 - Important Words example

    • Taken from The Star Spangled Banner by Elizabeth Raum
    • As the sun set last night, the sight of the flag flying over the fort filled us with pride. Now, as the morning sun begins to rise over the horizon, is the flag still there? Tell me, can you still see it?
    • The date was Sept. 14, 1814. The night before, Americans had fought the British in the Battle of Baltimore.
  18. Listen to examples of Expressive readers.High schoolers perform One Fish, Two Fish

    Slide 18 - Listen to examples of Expressive readers.High schoolers perform One Fish, Two Fish

  19. Listen to Shel Silverstein read with expression.

    Slide 19 - Listen to Shel Silverstein read with expression.

  20. Quiz

    Slide 20 - Quiz

  21. Quiz

    Slide 21 - Quiz

  22. Quiz

    Slide 22 - Quiz

  23. Bibliography

    Slide 23 - Bibliography

    • Websites:
    • Teaching that Makes Sense: http://www.ttms.org/say_about_a_book/how_do_expressive_readers_read.htm
    • http://www.ttms.org/say_about_a_book/expression_equals_comprehension.htm
    • Power Reading: https://sites.google.com/a/cvuhs.org/power-fluency/prosody/expressive-reading
    • YouTube Videos:
    • Shel Silverstein: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNiaYHZme_U
    • One Fish, Two Fish by Dr. Seuss: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WGK6-T7N9xA&feature=related
  24. Bibliography

    Slide 24 - Bibliography

    • Books
    • Furgang, Kathy. Krakatoa. New York: PowerKids Press, 2001.
    • Lewis, C.S. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. New York: Macmillan, 1950.
    • Noble, Trinka Hakes. Meanwhile Back at the Ranch. New York: Puffin Pied Piper, 1987.
    • Park, Barbara. Junie . Jones Loves Handsome Warren. New York: Scholastic, 1996.
    • Raum, Elizabeth. The Star-Spangled Banner. Mankato, MN: Capstone, 2009.
    • Scieszka, Jon. The Good, the Bad and the Goofy. New York: Puffin, 1992.
    • Scieszka, Jon. The Not-So-Jolly Roger. New York: Puffin, 1991.
    • Teague, Mark. The Three Little Pigs and the Somewhat Bad Wolf. New York: Orchard, 2013.
  25. Graphics

    Slide 25 - Graphics

    • Bookworm: mrsdively2.wikispaces.com
    • Up & Down Arrows: gvilleultimate.com
    • Road Sign: www.flickr.com
    • Quiet: www.flickr.com
    • Loud: tom.johnandrewrankin.com
    • Emoticons: inspiringbetterlife.blogspot.com
    • Repeat: nrich.maths.orog
    • Punctuation: eisforexplore.blogspot.ca
    • Keyword: www.submityourarticle.com
  26. Next Gen Standards

    Slide 26 - Next Gen Standards

    • ELA.4.R.C8.1 Students will read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
    • • read on-level text with purpose and understanding.
    • • read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate and expression.
    • • use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.
    • ELA.3.R.C8.1 Students will read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
    • • read on-level text with purpose and understanding.
    • • read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate and expression on successive
    • readings.
    • • use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary
    • ELA.2.R.C8.1 Students will read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
    • • read on-level text with purpose and understanding.
    • • read on-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate and expression.
    • • use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.