Quote Integration Workshop - Abridged

Using SOAPStone with Anchor History Documents and Things Fall Apart.

1.0x

Quote Integration Workshop - Abridged

Created 3 years ago

Duration 0:11:54
lesson view count 70
Using SOAPStone with Anchor History Documents and Things Fall Apart.
Select the file type you wish to download
Slide Content
  1. NHS Spring Anchor

    Slide 1 - NHS Spring Anchor

    • Mr. Banks & Mr. Mize
    • Writing Context and Integrating Quotes
  2. AGENDA

    Slide 2 - AGENDA

    • SOAPS-tone Overview
    • SOAPS-tone Application
    • Lugard quote
    • Context model
    • Integrated quote model
    • TFA model
    • Literary present vs. Historical past
  3. SOAPS-tone

    Slide 3 - SOAPS-tone

    • Speaker: Everything you know about the speaker/author (not just their name).
    • Audience: who is the author speaking to? Does the speaker use language or have a unique message for this specific audience?
    • Occasion: What event led to the author creating this? What do we know about the topic/event happening when this was written?
    • Purpose: What does the speaker hope to gain through this document?
    • Subject: What is the main idea of the document/ passage?
    • - tone: What is the author’s tone/ mood/ point of view? How is the author perceived by the audience?
  4. “I contend that we (Britons) are the finest race in the World, and that the more of the world we inhabit, the better it is for the human race…It is our duty to seize every opportunity of acquiring more territory and we should keep this one idea steadily before our eyes that more territory simply means more of the Anglo-Saxon race, more of the best, the most human, most honorable race the world possesses.”

    Slide 4 - “I contend that we (Britons) are the finest race in the World, and that the more of the world we inhabit, the better it is for the human race…It is our duty to seize every opportunity of acquiring more territory and we should keep this one idea steadily before our eyes that more territory simply means more of the Anglo-Saxon race, more of the best, the most human, most honorable race the world possesses.”

    • So, here is one of the documents we are going to use in our essay…
    • An excerpt from Cecil Rhodes’ book Confessions of Faith (1877).
    • Rhodes was an English businessman, magnate, politician, and ardent believer in imperialism.
  5. “I contend that we (Britons) are the finest race in the World, and that the more of the world we inhabit, the better it is for the human race… It is our duty to seize every opportunity of acquiring more territory and we should keep this one idea steadily before our eyes that more territory simply means more of the Anglo-Saxon race, more of the best, the most human, most honorable race the world possesses.”

    Slide 5 - “I contend that we (Britons) are the finest race in the World, and that the more of the world we inhabit, the better it is for the human race… It is our duty to seize every opportunity of acquiring more territory and we should keep this one idea steadily before our eyes that more territory simply means more of the Anglo-Saxon race, more of the best, the most human, most honorable race the world possesses.”

    • Of course we just use PART of the document that illustrates the main idea we are supporting, so...
  6. Speaker: Everything you know about the speaker/author (not just their name).

    Slide 6 - Speaker: Everything you know about the speaker/author (not just their name).

    • Cecil Rhodes
    • An English Businessman
    • Magnate
    • Politician
    • Ardent believer in imperialism
    • He has tons of nationalism
    • Possibly influenced by social Darwinism to think the Anglo-Saxon race is the best.
    • Possibly stands to gain from imperialism as a businessman and politician.
  7. Occasion: What event led to the author creating this? What do we know about the topic/event happening when this was written?

    Slide 7 - Occasion: What event led to the author creating this? What do we know about the topic/event happening when this was written?

    • Occasion:
    • Emergence of the British Empire and the Age of Imperialism. Specifically the British have created an “empire on which the sun never sets” and Rhodes is defending building a massive empire.
  8. Audience:

    Slide 8 - Audience:

    • 1. Who is the author speaking to?
    • 2. Does the speaker use language or have a unique message for this specific audience?
    • Audience: Rhodes is speaking to other British people, appealing to their sense of nationalism. His language emphasizes how great the British are maybe because he is hoping to win their support for imperialism.
  9. Purpose: What does the speaker hope to gain through this document?

    Slide 9 - Purpose: What does the speaker hope to gain through this document?

    • Purpose:
    • Rhodes is hoping to gain support for imperialism, as maybe there are people in Britain that are against the conquering of people all over the world.
    • He is also possibly hoping to personally benefit from imperialism as a successful businessman and politician.
  10. Subject: What is the main idea of the document/ passage?

    Slide 10 - Subject: What is the main idea of the document/ passage?

    • Subject:
    • The British are superior and therefore have the right to take any lands.
    • This will not only enrich the British but also uplift the natives.
  11. Tone:

    Slide 11 - Tone:

    • What is the author’s tone/ mood/ point of view?
    • How is the author perceived by the audience?
    • -Tone:
    • Nationalistic, jingoistic even.
    • Passionate
    • Persuasive
    • Confident
    • Powerful
  12. Phew… so what do we do with this now?

    Slide 12 - Phew… so what do we do with this now?

    • Speaker: Cecil Rhodes, an English businessman, magnate, politician, and ardent believer in imperialism… He is British. He has tons of nationalism. Possibly influenced by social Darwinism to think the Anglo-Saxon race is the best. Possibly stands to gain from imperialism as a businessman and politician.
    • Occasion: Emergence of the British Empire and the Age of Imperialism. Specifically the British have created an “empire on which the sun never sets” and Rhodes is defending building a massive empire.
    • Audience: Rhodes is speaking to other British people, appealing to their sense of nationalism. His language emphasizes how great the British are maybe because he is hoping to win their support for imperialism.
    • Purpose: Rhodes is hoping to gain support for imperialism, as maybe there are people in Britain that are against the conquering of people all over the world. He is also possibly hoping to personally benefit from imperialism as a successful businessman and politician.
    • Subject: The British are superior and therefore have the right to take any lands. This will not only enrich the British but also uplift the natives.
    • - tone: Nationalistic, jingoistic even. Passionate. Persuasive. Confident. Powerful.
  13. Cecil Rhodes, a British businessman and supporter of imperialism, appealed to his British countrymen to gain support for imperialism. His nationalistic tone was an attempt to persuade others to be in favor of the British Empire and increasing British power and wealth because they are superior and have the right to take any lands.

    Slide 14 - Cecil Rhodes, a British businessman and supporter of imperialism, appealed to his British countrymen to gain support for imperialism. His nationalistic tone was an attempt to persuade others to be in favor of the British Empire and increasing British power and wealth because they are superior and have the right to take any lands.

    • Speaker: Cecil Rhodes, an English businessman, magnate, politician, and ardent believer in imperialism… He is British. He has tons of nationalism. Possibly influenced by social Darwinism to think the Anglo-Saxon race is the best. Possibly stands to gain from imperialism as a businessman and politician.
    • Occasion: Emergence of the British Empire and the Age of Imperialism. Specifically the British have created an “empire on which the sun never sets” and Rhodes is defending building a massive empire.
    • Audience: Rhodes is speaking to other British people, appealing to their sense of nationalism. His language emphasizes how great the British are maybe because he is hoping to win their support for imperialism.
    • Purpose: Rhodes is hoping to gain support for imperialism, as maybe there are people in Britain that are against the conquering of people all over the world. He is also possibly hoping to personally benefit from imperialism as a successful businessman and politician.
    • Subject: The British are superior and therefore have the right to take any lands. This will not only enrich the British but also uplift the natives.
    • - tone: Nationalistic, jingoistic even. Passionate. Persuasive. Confident. Powerful.
  14. Cecil Rhodes, a British businessman and supporter of imperialism, appealed to his British countrymen to gain support for imperialism. His nationalistic tone was an attempt to persuade others to be in favor of the British Empire and increasing British power and wealth because they are superior and have the right to take any lands.

    Slide 15 - Cecil Rhodes, a British businessman and supporter of imperialism, appealed to his British countrymen to gain support for imperialism. His nationalistic tone was an attempt to persuade others to be in favor of the British Empire and increasing British power and wealth because they are superior and have the right to take any lands.

    • Speaker: Cecil Rhodes, an English businessman, magnate, politician, and ardent believer in imperialism… He is British. He has tons of nationalism. Possibly influenced by social Darwinism to think the Anglo-Saxon race is the best. Possibly stands to gain from imperialism as a businessman and politician.
    • Occasion: Emergence of the British Empire and the Age of Imperialism. Specifically the British have created an “empire on which the sun never sets” and Rhodes is defending building a massive empire.
    • Audience: Rhodes is speaking to other British people, appealing to their sense of nationalism. His language emphasizes how great the British are maybe because he is hoping to win their support for imperialism.
    • Purpose: Rhodes is hoping to gain support for imperialism, as maybe there are people in Britain that are against the conquering of people all over the world. He is also possibly hoping to personally benefit from imperialism as a successful businessman and politician.
    • Subject: The British are superior and therefore have the right to take any lands. This will not only enrich the British but also uplift the natives.
    • - tone: Nationalistic, jingoistic even. Passionate. Persuasive. Confident. Powerful.
  15. Now that we have some basic context, we just need to integrate our quote.

    Slide 16 - Now that we have some basic context, we just need to integrate our quote.

    • “It is our duty to seize every opportunity of acquiring more territory and we should keep this one idea steadily before our eyes that more territory simply means more of the Anglo-Saxon race, more of the best, the most human, most honorable race the world possesses.”
    • Cecil Rhodes, a British businessman and supporter of imperialism, appealed to his British countrymen to gain support for imperialism. His nationalistic tone was an attempt to persuade others to be in favor of the British Empire and increasing British power and wealth because they are superior and have the right to take any lands.
  16. Cecil Rhodes, a British businessman and supporter of imperialism, appealed to his British countrymen to gain support for imperialism. His nationalistic tone was an attempt to persuade others to be in favor of the British Empire and increasing British power and wealth because they should  “seize every opportunity of acquiring more territory and we should keep this one idea steadily before our eyes that more territory simply means more of the Anglo-Saxon race, more of the best, the most human, most honorable race the world possesses” (Rhodes).

    Slide 17 - Cecil Rhodes, a British businessman and supporter of imperialism, appealed to his British countrymen to gain support for imperialism. His nationalistic tone was an attempt to persuade others to be in favor of the British Empire and increasing British power and wealth because they should “seize every opportunity of acquiring more territory and we should keep this one idea steadily before our eyes that more territory simply means more of the Anglo-Saxon race, more of the best, the most human, most honorable race the world possesses” (Rhodes).

    • *Notice that the verbs are in the past tense.
  17. District Commissioner

    Slide 19 - District Commissioner

    • “We shall not do you any harm,” said the District Commissioner to them later, “if only you agree to cooperate with us. We have brought a peaceful administration to you and your people so that you may be happy” (Achebe 194).
  18. District Commissioner

    Slide 20 - District Commissioner

    • European (British) authority figure responsible for advancing the interests of the European settlers and missionaries.
    • His headquarters were in Umuofia where a court was built and he judged cases in ignorance.
    • His henchmen are called court messengers, or kotma. They function as a type of enforcement or police.
    • Speaker
  19. Slide 21

    • The District Commissioner has invited the village elders of Umuofia to join him at his headquarters in order to discuss the recent conflict between the church and the village over the unmasking of an egwugwu. The village burned down Reverend James Smith’s church.
    • Occasion
  20. Slide 22

    • The village elders of Umuofia, including Okonwko
    • Audience
  21. Slide 23

    • The District Commissioner has called this meeting not to settle differences but to exert himself as the true authority figure in Umuofia and all of Ibo land.
    • He wants them to take the blame for burning the church.
    • He wants them to see the British as a benefit to their way of life.
    • Purpose
  22. Slide 24

    • The District Commissioner is essentially telling the village elders that he and his kotma must be obeyed.
    • Subject
  23. Assertive

    Slide 25 - Assertive

    • Powerful
    • Manipulative
    • Paternalistic
    • Tone
  24. The District Commissioner, the authority figure responsible for advancing and protecting European interests, calls the village elders of Umuofia to his headquarters to discuss the burning down of the church. He wants to clarify who is truly in charge of Umuofia by asserting his power over the village elders so that he and his kotma must be obeyed.

    Slide 26 - The District Commissioner, the authority figure responsible for advancing and protecting European interests, calls the village elders of Umuofia to his headquarters to discuss the burning down of the church. He wants to clarify who is truly in charge of Umuofia by asserting his power over the village elders so that he and his kotma must be obeyed.

    • Speaker: District Commissioner
    • European (British) authority figure responsible for advancing the interests of the European settlers and missionaries.
    • Occasion: The District Commissioner has invited the village elders of Umuofia to join him at his headquarters in order to discuss the recent conflict between the church and the village over the unmasking of an egwugwu. The village burned down Reverend James Smith’s church.
    • Audience: village elders, including Okonkwo
    • Purpose: The District Commissioner has called this meeting not to settle differences but to exert himself as the true authority figure in Umuofia and all of Ibo land. He wants them to take the blame for burning the church.
    • He wants them to see the British as a benefit to their way of life.
    • Subject: The District Commissioner is essentially telling the village elders that he and his kotma must be obeyed.
    • - tone: Assertive, powerful, manipulative, paternalistic
  25. The District Commissioner, the authority figure responsible for advancing and protecting European interests, calls the village elders of Umuofia to his headquarters to discuss the burning down of the church. He wants to clarify who is truly in charge of Umuofia by asserting his power over the village elders so that he and his kotma must be obeyed.

    Slide 27 - The District Commissioner, the authority figure responsible for advancing and protecting European interests, calls the village elders of Umuofia to his headquarters to discuss the burning down of the church. He wants to clarify who is truly in charge of Umuofia by asserting his power over the village elders so that he and his kotma must be obeyed.

    • “We shall not do you any harm,” said the District Commissioner to them later, “if only you agree to cooperate with us. We have brought a peaceful administration to you and your people so that you may be happy” (Achebe 194).
  26. After the village elders burn down the church in Umuofia, the District Commissioner, the authority figure responsible for advancing and protecting British interests, calls them to his headquarters. By stating that “[w]e have brought a peaceful administration to you and your people so that you may be happy” he is manipulating the village elders to accept full blame and acknowledge the benefits of being under British rule (Achebe 194).

    Slide 28 - After the village elders burn down the church in Umuofia, the District Commissioner, the authority figure responsible for advancing and protecting British interests, calls them to his headquarters. By stating that “[w]e have brought a peaceful administration to you and your people so that you may be happy” he is manipulating the village elders to accept full blame and acknowledge the benefits of being under British rule (Achebe 194).

    • *Notice that the verbs are in the present tense.
  27. HELPFUL Integration HINTS

    Slide 29 - HELPFUL Integration HINTS

    • [1] It is okay to have TWO sentences of context. It’s better to have two sentences that flow together instead of one that is just overloaded with information AND an integrated quote.
    • [2] Don’t add commas before the quote unless needed.
  28. HELPFUL Integration HINTS

    Slide 30 - HELPFUL Integration HINTS

    • [3] Be sure that your quote flows with your words. Use brackets to show a change in the quote to promote FLOW in your integration.
    • [4] You don’t have to have a direct quote from a character in Things Fall Apart. You can use the words of the narrator as well. [ The speaker would be either Achebe or ‘the narrator’. ]
  29. AGENDA

    Slide 31 - AGENDA

    • SOAPS-tone Overview
    • SOAPS-tone Application
    • Lugard quote
    • Context model
    • Integrated quote model
    • TFA model
    • Literary present vs. Historical past