13 SURVEY OF 1ST AND 2ND THESS AND PHILEMONaudio

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13 SURVEY OF 1ST AND 2ND THESS AND PHILEMONaudio

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  1. 2015 Spring Study

    Slide 1 - 2015 Spring Study

    • “Preparing For The Future”
    • Session 13: Survey of 1ST 2ND THESSALONIANS AND PHILEMON
  2. READ THE BOOK THROUGH MANY TIMES

    Slide 3 - READ THE BOOK THROUGH MANY TIMES

    • READ IT THROUGH SLOWLY TAKING NOTES
    • READ IT THROUGH AGAIN
    • TRY TO UNDERSTAND THE MAIN POINT
    • TRY AND FIGURE WHAT THE MAIN VERSE IS
    • OUTLINE THE BOOK YOURSELF
    • STUDY. . .STUDY. . .STUDY
  3. THESSALONIANS, EPISTLES TO THE

    Slide 5 - THESSALONIANS, EPISTLES TO THE

    • Christ's coming and kingdom were his chief topic (1 Thess 1:10; 2:12,19; 3:13; 4:13-18; 5:1-11,23-24), that the Thessalonians should walk worthy of it (1 Thess 4:1). It is an undesigned coincidence confirming the authenticity of the history and of the epistles that the very charge which Jason's assailants brought against the brethren was "these do contrary to the decrees of Caesar, saying that there is another king, one Jesus" (Acts 17:5-9). So in Jesus' own case they perverted His doctrine of His coming kingdom into a charge of treason against Caesar. So also the doctrine of the resurrection is prominent both in Luke's history (Acts 17:3) and in Paul's independent epistle (1 Thess 1:10; 4:14-16).
    • Paul and Silas had to flee by night to Berea; but the church and ministers had been constituted, and the Thessalonians became missionaries virtually themselves (for which the city's commerce gave facilities) both by word and by example, the report of which had reached Macedonia where Paul had been, and Achaia where he now was, at Corinth (1 Thess 1:7-8).
  4. From Berea Paul, after having planted a Scripture-loving church. was obliged to flee by the Thessalonian Jews who followed him there Timothy (who apparently came to Berea separately from Paul and Silas; compare Acts 17:10 with Acts 17:14) and Silas remained there still, when Paul proceeded by sea to Athens. While at Athens Paul longed to visit the Thessalonians again, and see their spiritual state, and "perfect that which was lacking in their faith" (1 Thess 3:10); but "Satan (through the instrumentality of the Thessalonian Jews probably, John 13:27) hindered" him (1 Thess 2:18; Acts 17:13). He therefore sent Timothy, who followed him apparently to Athens from Berea (Acts 17:15), and immediately on his arrival at Athens to Thessalonica (1 Thess 3:1). Much as he would have desired Timothy's help against his Athenian opponents, he determined to forego it for the sake of the Thessalonian church. Silas does not appear to have come to Paul at Athens at all, though Paul had desired him and Timothy to "come to him with all speed" (Acts 17:15), but with Timothy (who from Thessalonica called for him at Berea) joined Paul at Corinth first (Acts 18:1,5; "when Silas and Timothy were come from Macedonia"). The epistle mentions Timothy at Athens (1 Thess 3:12), but not Silas.

    Slide 6 - From Berea Paul, after having planted a Scripture-loving church. was obliged to flee by the Thessalonian Jews who followed him there Timothy (who apparently came to Berea separately from Paul and Silas; compare Acts 17:10 with Acts 17:14) and Silas remained there still, when Paul proceeded by sea to Athens. While at Athens Paul longed to visit the Thessalonians again, and see their spiritual state, and "perfect that which was lacking in their faith" (1 Thess 3:10); but "Satan (through the instrumentality of the Thessalonian Jews probably, John 13:27) hindered" him (1 Thess 2:18; Acts 17:13). He therefore sent Timothy, who followed him apparently to Athens from Berea (Acts 17:15), and immediately on his arrival at Athens to Thessalonica (1 Thess 3:1). Much as he would have desired Timothy's help against his Athenian opponents, he determined to forego it for the sake of the Thessalonian church. Silas does not appear to have come to Paul at Athens at all, though Paul had desired him and Timothy to "come to him with all speed" (Acts 17:15), but with Timothy (who from Thessalonica called for him at Berea) joined Paul at Corinth first (Acts 18:1,5; "when Silas and Timothy were come from Macedonia"). The epistle mentions Timothy at Athens (1 Thess 3:12), but not Silas.

  5. Timothy "brought good tidings of the Thessalonian church's faith and love, and good remembrance of Paul, and desire to see him" as he desired to see them (1 Thess 3:6-10). Their defect was the exclusive dwelling of some on Christ's kingdom to such a degree as to neglect present duties (1 Thess 4:11-12). Some who had lost relatives by death doubted whether they who died before Christ's coming would share with those found alive, in His kingdom then to be revealed. Some had been quarrelsome and revengeful (1 Thess 5:13,15); others had even relapsed into pagan lusts, fornication, and adultery (1 Thess 4:3-10). Some were insubordinate toward ministers, and slighted the manifestations of the Spirit in those possessing His gifts as "prophesyings" (1 Thess 5:12-13,19-20). To correct these defects, to praise their graces, and to testify his love, is Paul's aim in this epistle.

    Slide 7 - Timothy "brought good tidings of the Thessalonian church's faith and love, and good remembrance of Paul, and desire to see him" as he desired to see them (1 Thess 3:6-10). Their defect was the exclusive dwelling of some on Christ's kingdom to such a degree as to neglect present duties (1 Thess 4:11-12). Some who had lost relatives by death doubted whether they who died before Christ's coming would share with those found alive, in His kingdom then to be revealed. Some had been quarrelsome and revengeful (1 Thess 5:13,15); others had even relapsed into pagan lusts, fornication, and adultery (1 Thess 4:3-10). Some were insubordinate toward ministers, and slighted the manifestations of the Spirit in those possessing His gifts as "prophesyings" (1 Thess 5:12-13,19-20). To correct these defects, to praise their graces, and to testify his love, is Paul's aim in this epistle.

    • The place of writing was Corinth, where Timothy, with Silas, rejoined Paul (Acts 18:5).
  6. The time of writing. Soon after Timothy's arrival with tidings of their state (1 Thess 2:17; 3:6), in the autumn  A.D. 52. Paul wrote in the winter of that year, or else early in  A.D. 53 at the beginning of his stay of one year and a half at Corinth (Acts 18:11). (Timothy had been sent probably from Athens to inquire: 1 Thess 3:1-2). For it was written not long after the conversion of the Thessalonians (1 Thess 1:8-9), while Paul could speak of himself as only "taken from them for a short season" (1 Thess 2:17). Hence, it was first in date of all Paul's extant epistles. Paul, Silas, and Timothy, the three founders of the Thessalonion church, stand at its head in the inscription. "We" is written everywhere except in 1 Thess 2:18; 3:5; 5:27; "we" is the true reading in 1 Thess 4:13. The KJV "I" in 1 Thess 4:9; 5:1,23, is not in the original.

    Slide 8 - The time of writing. Soon after Timothy's arrival with tidings of their state (1 Thess 2:17; 3:6), in the autumn A.D. 52. Paul wrote in the winter of that year, or else early in A.D. 53 at the beginning of his stay of one year and a half at Corinth (Acts 18:11). (Timothy had been sent probably from Athens to inquire: 1 Thess 3:1-2). For it was written not long after the conversion of the Thessalonians (1 Thess 1:8-9), while Paul could speak of himself as only "taken from them for a short season" (1 Thess 2:17). Hence, it was first in date of all Paul's extant epistles. Paul, Silas, and Timothy, the three founders of the Thessalonion church, stand at its head in the inscription. "We" is written everywhere except in 1 Thess 2:18; 3:5; 5:27; "we" is the true reading in 1 Thess 4:13. The KJV "I" in 1 Thess 4:9; 5:1,23, is not in the original.

    • (from Fausset's Bible Dictionary, Electronic Database Copyright © 1998, 2003, 2006 by Biblesoft, Inc. All rights reserved.)
  7. Design. The report from Thessalonica after the first epistle represented the faith and love of the church there as on the increase, and their constancy amidst persecutions unshaken. Their only error needing correction was that Paul's description of Christ's sudden second coming (1 Thess 4:13; 5:2), possibly at any moment, led them to believe it actually imminent. Some professed to know by "the Spirit" (2 Thess 2:2) it was so, others declared Paul when with them had said so; a letter purporting to be from him to that effect was circulated among them (2 Thess 2:2, in 2 Thess 3:17 he marks his autograph salutation as the test whereby to know his genuine letters). Hence some ceased to mind their daily work, and cast themselves on the charity of others as if their only duty was to look for Christ's immediate coming.

    Slide 9 - Design. The report from Thessalonica after the first epistle represented the faith and love of the church there as on the increase, and their constancy amidst persecutions unshaken. Their only error needing correction was that Paul's description of Christ's sudden second coming (1 Thess 4:13; 5:2), possibly at any moment, led them to believe it actually imminent. Some professed to know by "the Spirit" (2 Thess 2:2) it was so, others declared Paul when with them had said so; a letter purporting to be from him to that effect was circulated among them (2 Thess 2:2, in 2 Thess 3:17 he marks his autograph salutation as the test whereby to know his genuine letters). Hence some ceased to mind their daily work, and cast themselves on the charity of others as if their only duty was to look for Christ's immediate coming.

  8. Paul therefore tells them (2 Thess 2) that before the Lord shall come there must first be a great apostasy, and the man of sin be revealed; and that to neglect daily business would only bring scandal on the church, and was contrary to his own practice among them (2 Thess 3:7-9), and that believers must withdraw from such disorderly walkers (2 Thes. 3:6; 10-15 ).

    Slide 10 - Paul therefore tells them (2 Thess 2) that before the Lord shall come there must first be a great apostasy, and the man of sin be revealed; and that to neglect daily business would only bring scandal on the church, and was contrary to his own practice among them (2 Thess 3:7-9), and that believers must withdraw from such disorderly walkers (2 Thes. 3:6; 10-15 ).

    • Divisions. (1) 2 Thess 1; he commends the Thessalonians' faith, love, and patience, amidst persecutions. (2) 2 Thess 2; corrects their error as to Christ's immediate coming, and foretells that the man of sin (see ANTICHRIST) must first rise and perish. (3) 2 Thess 3:1-16; exhorts to orderly conduct, prays the God of peace in their behalf, autograph salutation and blessing.
  9. Date and place of writing. He must have written at Corinth during his one year and six months' stay (Acts 18:11, namely, beginning with the autumn  A.D. 52, and ending with the spring  A.D. 54), probably six months after his first epistle  A.D. 53; for Timothy and Silas, whose names are joined with his own in the inscription were with him at Corinth, and not with him for a long time after he left that city (Acts 18:18, compare Acts 19:22). Silas was probably never afterward any length of time with Paul.

    Slide 11 - Date and place of writing. He must have written at Corinth during his one year and six months' stay (Acts 18:11, namely, beginning with the autumn A.D. 52, and ending with the spring A.D. 54), probably six months after his first epistle A.D. 53; for Timothy and Silas, whose names are joined with his own in the inscription were with him at Corinth, and not with him for a long time after he left that city (Acts 18:18, compare Acts 19:22). Silas was probably never afterward any length of time with Paul.

  10. Misunderstanding about the second coming

    Slide 12 - Misunderstanding about the second coming

    • Immoral problems
    • General instructions about conduct
    • Written by Paul 52 or 53
  11. Both epistles deal with the 2nd coming.

    Slide 13 - Both epistles deal with the 2nd coming.

    • 1 Thess 4:13-14
    • 13 But I do not want you to be ignorant, brethren, concerning those who have fallen asleep, lest you sorrow as others who have no hope.
    • 14 For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so God will bring with Him those who sleep in Jesus.*
  12. Slide 14

    • 1 Thess 4:15-18
    • 15 For this we say to you by the word of the Lord, that we who are alive and remain until the coming of the Lord will by no means precede those who are asleep.
    • 16 For the Lord Himself will descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of an archangel, and with the trumpet of God. And the dead in Christ will rise first.
    • 17 Then we who are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air. And thus we shall always be with the Lord.
    • 18 Therefore comfort one another with these words.
  13. PHILEMON, EPISTLE TO

    Slide 15 - PHILEMON, EPISTLE TO

    • Anthenticity of. Origen (Hom. 19, Jer. 1:185) quotes it as Paul's. Tertullian (Marcion 5:21), "the brevity of this epistle is the cause of its escaping Marcion's falsifying hands." Eusebius (E. H. 3:25) ranks it among "the universally acknowledged (homologoumena) epistles of the canon." Jerome (Prooem. Philem. iv. 442) argues against those who thought its Subject beneath an apostle. Ignatius (Ephesians 2, Magnes. 12) alludes to Philem 20. Compare Polycarp 1 and 6. The catalogues, the Muratori Fragment, the list of Athanasius (Ep. 39), Jerome (Ep. 2 ad Paulin.), the council of Laodicea ( A.D. 364), and the third of Carthage ( A.D. 397) support it. Its brevity accounts for the few quotations from it in the fathers. Paley (Hor. Paul.) shows its authenticity from the undesigned coincidences between it and the epistle to the Colossians.
  14. Place and time of writing. The same bearer Onesimus bore it and epistle to Colossians; in the latter (Col 4:7-9) Tychicus is joined with Onesimus. Both address Archippus (Philem 2; Col 4:17). Paul and Timothy stand in both headings. In both Paul writes as a prisoner (Philem 9; Col 4:18). Both were written at Rome during the early and freer portion of Paul's first imprisonment,  A.D. 62; in Philem 22 he anticipates a speedy release.

    Slide 16 - Place and time of writing. The same bearer Onesimus bore it and epistle to Colossians; in the latter (Col 4:7-9) Tychicus is joined with Onesimus. Both address Archippus (Philem 2; Col 4:17). Paul and Timothy stand in both headings. In both Paul writes as a prisoner (Philem 9; Col 4:18). Both were written at Rome during the early and freer portion of Paul's first imprisonment, A.D. 62; in Philem 22 he anticipates a speedy release.

    • Aim. This epistle is a beautiful sample of Christianity applied to every day life and home relations and mutual duty of master and servant (Ps 101:2-7). Onesimus of Colosse, (Col 4:9), Philemon's slave, had fled to Rome after defrauding his master (Philem 18). Paul there was instrumental in converting him; then persuaded him to return (Philem 12) and gave him this epistle, recommending him to Philemon's favorable reception as henceforth about to be his "forever," no longer unprofitable but, realizing his name, "profitable to Paul and Philemon" (Philem 11,15). Not until Philem 10, and not until its end, does the name occur. Paul skillfully makes the favorable description precede the name which had fallen into so bad repute with Philemon; "I beseech thee for my son whom I begat in my bonds, Onesimus."
  15. Trusting soon to be free Paul begs Philemon to prepare him a lodging at Colosse. Paul addresses this epistle also to Apphia, who, from its domestic subject, is supposed to have been Philemon's wife, and to Archippus, a minister of the Colossian (Col 4:17) church, and supposed to be Philemon's relative and inmate of his house.

    Slide 17 - Trusting soon to be free Paul begs Philemon to prepare him a lodging at Colosse. Paul addresses this epistle also to Apphia, who, from its domestic subject, is supposed to have been Philemon's wife, and to Archippus, a minister of the Colossian (Col 4:17) church, and supposed to be Philemon's relative and inmate of his house.

    • Style. Graceful delicacy and genuine politeness, combined with a natural, easy, free flow of feeling and thought, characterize this elegant epistle. Manly and straightforward, without insincere compliment, suppression, or misrepresentation of facts, it at once charms and persuades. Luther says: "it shows a lovely example of Christian love. Paul layeth himself out for poor Onesimus, and with all his means pleadeth his cause with his master, and so setteth himself as if he were Onesimus and had himself done wrong to Philemon. Yet all this doeth he, not with force as if he had a right thereto, but strippeth himself of his right and thus enforceth Philemon to forego his right also: even as Christ did for us with God the Father; for Christ also stripped Himself of His right and by love and humility enforced (?) the Father to lay aside His wrath and power and to take us to His grace for the sake of Christ, who lovingly pleadeth our cause and with all His heart layeth Himself out for us; for we are all His Onesimi
  16. Slide 18

    • Written by Paul around 62 AD
    • Written to an individual, Philemon
    • Written with an appeal to Christian virtue
    • EPISTLE TO PHILEMON
  17. 21 Having confidence in your obedience, I write to you, knowing that you will do even more than I say.

    Slide 19 - 21 Having confidence in your obedience, I write to you, knowing that you will do even more than I say.

    • 22 But, meanwhile, also prepare a guest room for me, for I trust that through your prayers I shall be granted to you.
    • EPISTLE TO PHILEMON
  18. 2015 Spring Study

    Slide 20 - 2015 Spring Study

    • “Preparing For The Future”
    • Session 13: Survey of 1ST 2ND THESSALONIANS AND PHILEMON
  19. Outline of Future 2014 Sessions

    Slide 21 - Outline of Future 2014 Sessions

    • JANUARY 2015
    • 19 Orientation
    • 26 Inspiration of Scripture
    • FEBRUARY
    • 2 Genesis Though Deuteronomy 9 Joshua Through 2 Chronicles 16 The Prophets
    • 23 The Old Testament Poetry
    • MARCH
    • NEW TESTAMENT SURVEY
    • 2 The Synoptic Gospels
    • 9 The Gospel of John
    • 16 Acts
    • 23 A Survey of Romans
    • 30 A Survey of 1st and 2nd Corinthians
    • APRIL
    • 6 A Survey of Galatians, Ephesians, Colossians,
    • Philippines.
    • 13 1st and 2nd Thessalonians, Philemon 20 1s and 2nd Timothy and Titus
    • 27 James
    • MAY
    • 4 Hebrews
    • 11 1st and 2nd Peter, Jude
    • 18 1st 2nd 3rd John
    • 25 Revelation
    • JUNE
    • 1 The Life of Christ Part 1
    • 8 The Life of Christ Part 2
    • 15 The Life of Christ Part 3
    • 22 The Teachings of Christ Part 1
    • 29 The Teachings of Christ Part 2
  20. Outline of Future 2014 Sessions

    Slide 22 - Outline of Future 2014 Sessions

    • JULY 2015
    • 6 The Gospel of Christ
    • 13 Examples of Conversion
    • 20 Process of Conversion Part 1
    • 27 Process of Conversion Part 2
    • AUGUST
    • 3 “I’m A New Man” (New Creature)
    • 10 The Christ, The Cross, and The
    • Church
    • 17 The Establishment of The Church
    • 24 The Identity of The Church
    • 31 New Testament Worship
    • SEPTEMBER
    • 7 Authority, The Pattern, and
    • Innovation (1)
    • 14 Authority, The Pattern, and
    • Innovation (2)
    • 21 Authority, The Pattern, and
    • Innovation (3)
    • 28 Basis For Christian Unity
    • OCTOBER
    • 5 Fellowship
    • 12 Spiritual Gifts and Miracles
    • 19 Church Government
    • 26 Church Discipline
    • NOVEMBER
    • 2 Discipleship
    • 9 Works of Flesh and Fruits of Spirit
    • 16 Love & The Law of Love
    • 23 CLOSED FOR HOLIDAY
    • 30 The Christian Graces
    • DECEMBER
    • 7 The Devil and Temptation
    • 14 The Holy Spirit