Review-Inferences Conclusions Context Clues Authors Purpose-Recording

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Review-Inferences Conclusions Context Clues Authors Purpose-Recording

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  1. Inferences, Conclusions, Context Clues, and Author’s Purpose!

    Slide 1 - Inferences, Conclusions, Context Clues, and Author’s Purpose!

    • Key Literary Terms Review
  2. Essential Question(s): Why is making inferences an important skill? How can you use context clues to find the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary? Why do authors write a particular text?

    Slide 2 - Essential Question(s): Why is making inferences an important skill? How can you use context clues to find the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary? Why do authors write a particular text?

    • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:
    • Draw inferences and conclusions using clues in the text and experience
    • Use context clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary
    • Determine author’s purpose in a text.
    • State Standards:
    • CC.1.2.9-10.B: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences and conclusions based on an author’s explicit assumptions and beliefs about a subject.
    • Student Terms: Be a detective and use clues from the text to reveal the author’s thoughts and messages.
    • Lesson Objectives
  3. Vocabulary

    Slide 3 - Vocabulary

    • Inferences
    • Conclusions
    • Context Clues
    • Author’s Purpose
    • Let’s review our vocab terms, class!
  4. An inference or conclusion is an educated guess you can draw from reading a text that uses both details from the text and your own knowledge.

    Slide 4 - An inference or conclusion is an educated guess you can draw from reading a text that uses both details from the text and your own knowledge.

    • An inference or conclusion will not be directly stated in the reading, but you can tell it is most likely true because of the clues in the reading.
    • Inferences and Conclusions
    • You have to be a detective!
  5. Make sure your inferences rely mainly on the author’s words rather than your own feelings or experiences.

    Slide 5 - Make sure your inferences rely mainly on the author’s words rather than your own feelings or experiences.

    • Your goal is to read the author’s mind not invent your own message
    • Check to see if your inference is proven wrong by any statements in the paragraph. If it is, it’s not a useful inference.
    • If the passage is a difficult one, check to see if you can actually identify the statements that led you to your conclusion.
    • This will help you to test your understanding of the text.
    • Tips for Drawing Inferences and Conclusions
  6. Slide 6

    • Read the following passage and respond to the question.
    • Every day after work Paul took his muddy boots off on the steps of the front porch. Alice would have a fit if the boots made it so far as the welcome mat. He then took off his dusty overalls and threw them into a plastic garbage bag; Alice left a new garbage bag tied to the porch railing for him every morning. On his way in the house, he dropped the garbage bag off at the washing machine and went straight up stairs to the shower as he was instructed. He would eat dinner with her after he was “presentable,” as Alice had often said.
    • 1. What type of job does Paul work?
    • How do you know this?
  7. Slide 7

    • Let’s review which details from the text and what prior knowledge led us to believe that Paul could possibly work in the construction field.
    • Every day after work Paul took his muddy boots off on the steps of the front porch. Alice would have a fit if the boots made it so far as the welcome mat. He then took off his dusty overalls and threw them into a plastic garbage bag; Alice left a new garbage bag tied to the porch railing for him every morning. On his way in the house, he dropped the garbage bag off at the washing machine and went straight up stairs to the shower as he was instructed. He would eat dinner with her after he was “presentable,” as Alice had often said.
  8. Slide 8

    • Summary
    • An inference or conclusion is an educated guess you can draw from reading a text that uses both details from the text and your own knowledge.
    • An inference or conclusion will not be directly stated in the text; we have to be detectives!
    • We make inferences and conclusions all of the time!
  9. Draw inferences and conclusions using clues in the text and personal experience.

    Slide 9 - Draw inferences and conclusions using clues in the text and personal experience.

    • Review ObjectivesCan you do it?
  10. Context Clues

    Slide 10 - Context Clues

    • Get ready to be a detective…
  11. Context Clues:What Are They?

    Slide 11 - Context Clues:What Are They?

    • Context clues are bits of information from the text that, when combined with prior knowledge, allow you to decide the meaning of unknown words in the story or article you are reading.
    • As a reader you must act similar to a detective and put together clues from sentences surrounding an unknown word in order to make an intelligent “guess” as to what the definition of a word is.
  12. Context Clues: How Do They Help You Read New Words?

    Slide 12 - Context Clues: How Do They Help You Read New Words?

    • Textbook writers and authors include words or phrases to help their readers understand the meaning of a new or difficult word.
    • These words or phrases are built into the sentences around the new or difficult word. By becoming more aware of the words around a difficult word, readers can make logical guesses about the meanings of many words.
  13. Types of Context Clues

    Slide 13 - Types of Context Clues

    • Authors use many different types of context clues when writing, including:
    • Direct Definition Clues
    • His emaciation, that is, his skeleton-like appearance, was frightening to see.
    • Example Clues
    • Piscatorial creatures, such as flounder, salmon, and trout, live in the coldest parts of the ocean.
    • Synonym Clues
    • When buying a diamond, people are wise to go to a reputable store, one that has been in business for a long time and has a well respected name.
  14. Types of Context Clues

    Slide 14 - Types of Context Clues

    • Authors use many different types of context clues when writing texts, including:
    • Antonym Clues
    • The children were as different as day and night. He was a lively conversationalist, but she was reserved and taciturn.
    • Mood Clues
    • The lugubrious wails of the gypsies matched the dreary whistling of the wind in the all-but-deserted cemetery.
    • Cause and Effect Clues
    • Because the young boy wanted to learn about everything, he was very inquisitive.
  15. Summary

    Slide 15 - Summary

    • Context clues help us to understand the meaning of words that we do not know.
    • We looked at some different types of context clues!
  16. Define context clues

    Slide 16 - Define context clues

    • Define and use different types of context clues.
    • Review ObjectivesCan you do it?
  17. Author’s Purpose

    Slide 17 - Author’s Purpose

    • Why do author’s write the things they do?
  18. Author’s purpose is the reason why an author writes a particular text.

    Slide 18 - Author’s purpose is the reason why an author writes a particular text.

    • Author’s Purpose
  19. Ask yourself:

    Slide 19 - Ask yourself:

    • Why did the author write this?
    • What TYPE (genre) of text is this?
    • Is it informative? Descriptive? Narrative? Persuasive?
    • What is the author’s tone?
    • How does the author FEEL about his/her subject?
    • Does the author show any bias?
    • Is he/she being completely factual?
    • Does he/she include opinions?
    • Does he/she use any strong language or loaded words?
    • Tips for Author’s Purpose
  20. Slide 20

    • Summary
    • Author’s purpose is the reason why an author writes a particular text.
    • You should consider genre, tone, and bias when determining author’s purpose.
  21. Determine author’s purpose in a text.

    Slide 21 - Determine author’s purpose in a text.

    • Review ObjectivesCan you do it?